08-10_Rodgers%2C+Peng%2C+Wang+_+Hou+_2004_+Dialectical+self+and+psychological+well-being

08-10_Rodgers%2C+Peng%2C+Wang+_+Hou+_2004_+Dialectical+self+and+psychological+well-being

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Unformatted text preview: http://psp.sagepub.com/ Bulletin Personality and Social Psychology http://psp.sagepub.com/content/30/11/1416 The online version of this article can be found at: DOI: 10.1177/0146167204264243 2004 30: 1416 Pers Soc Psychol Bull Julie Spencer-Rodgers, Kaiping Peng, Lei Wang and Yubo Hou Dialectical Self-Esteem and East-West Differences in Psychological Well-Being Published by: http://www.sagepublications.com On behalf of: Society for Personality and Social Psychology can be found at: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin Additional services and information for http://psp.sagepub.com/cgi/alerts Email Alerts: http://psp.sagepub.com/subscriptions Subscriptions: http://www.sagepub.com/journalsReprints.nav Reprints: http://www.sagepub.com/journalsPermissions.nav Permissions: http://psp.sagepub.com/content/30/11/1416.refs.html Citations: at UNIV CALIFORNIA BERKELEY LIB on July 3, 2011 psp.sagepub.com Downloaded from 10.1 7 /0146167204264243 PERSONALITY AND SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY BUL ETIN Spencer-Rodgers et al. / DIALECTICAL SELF-ESTE M Dialectical Self-Esteem and East-West Differences in Psychological Well-Being Julie Spencer-Rodgers Kaiping Peng University of California, Berkeley Lei Wang Yubo Hou Peking University A well-documented finding in the literature is that members of many East Asian cultures report lower self-esteem and psycholog- ical well-being than do members of Western cultures. The authors present the results of four studies that examined cultural differences in reasoning about psychological contradiction and the effects of naive dialecticism on self-evaluations and psycho- logical adjustment. Mainland Chinese and Asian Americans exhibited greater “ambivalence” or evaluative contradiction in their self-attitudes than did Western synthesis-oriented cultures on a traditional self-report measure of self-esteem (Study 1) and in their spontaneous self-descriptions (Study 2). Naive dialecti- cism, as assessed with the Dialectical Self Scale, mediated the observed cultural differences in self-esteem and well-being (Study 3). In Study 4, the authors primed naive dialecticism and found that increased dialecticism was related to decreased psychological adjustment. Implications for the conceptualiza- tion and measurement of self-esteem and psychological well- being across cultures are discussed. Keywords: self-esteem; well-being; self-concept; cross-cultural differ- ences; attitudinal ambivalence; East Asians A common and well-documented finding in the litera- ture is that many East Asian cultures and East Asian minority groups report lower levels of self-esteem and well-being than do Western cultures. To illustrate, Japa- nese, Chinese, and Koreans report lower life satisfaction, more negative affect (e.g., guilt and shame), and greater anxiety, depression, and pessimism than do other cul- tural groups (Diener & Diener, 1995; Heine & Lehman, 1997a; Kitayama, Markus, & Kurokawa, 2000; Kitayama, Markus, Matsumoto, & Norasakkunkit, 1997; Lee & Seligman, 1997). Judgments of happiness and subjectiveSeligman, 1997)....
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This note was uploaded on 08/15/2011 for the course PSYCH 166AC taught by Professor Peng during the Summer '11 term at Berkeley.

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08-10_Rodgers%2C+Peng%2C+Wang+_+Hou+_2004_+Dialectical+self+and+psychological+well-being

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