07152011_05_Cultures+and+Meaning+Systems

07152011_05_Cultures+and+Meaning+Systems -...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–11. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Lecture 5 Cultures and Meaning Systems Psych166 AC: Cultural Psychology
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Culture as meaning system A dominant symbolic meaning  system (including language, ideas,  knowledge, theories and beliefs,  etc.) sustained and transmitted  over generations by members of a  given society, which then shape  the member’s psychological  processes . 2
Background image of page 2
Outline Language as meaning system Culture and nonverbal behaviors Communication style Bilingualism and Culture 3
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Concrete and symbolic meanings Language is an important tool to be  used to convey the concrete and  symbolic meanings. The room is too hot”      -- concrete object (room temperature) “You are hot”       -- symbolic meaning, metaphorical 4
Background image of page 4
1. Language as meaning system We use it for  socialization  and for  communication.  So that  values and norms can be expressed and  understood.  There are approximately 20 different language  families that cut across national borders.  Not only are words different, but also syntax and  usages are also quite different between language  families.  5
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Numbers of speakers of major  languages (estimated) 6
Background image of page 6
1.1 Language Differences across Cultures Culture and lexicons: • Self-other referents: In US, I and We are used to refer to self.  In Japan, how to refer to self depend on the relationship  between people. Speech pragmatics:  how language is used and  understood in different social contexts. • High-context languages vs. low-context languages • Politeness: “ my son is not smart ”. Language barrier:  meaning lost  in translation • The perils of translation (You are invited to take advantage of  the chambermaid; We take your bags and send them in all  directions; the frequent speaker) • More subtle influence: Blind side (How many  f s in this  sentence ?) 7
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
How many Fs in this sentence? FINISHED FILES ARE THE RESULT OF  YEARS OF SCIENTIFIC STUDY  COMBINED WITH THE EXPERIENCE  OF YEARS. 8
Background image of page 8
1.2 Theory on language and human behavior Sapir-Whorf Hypothesis:  • Also referred to “linguistic relativity”, suggests  that speakers of different languages think  differently, and that they do so because of the  difference in their languages.  Edward Sapir (1884—1939) and his student  Benjamin Whorf (1897—1941) • Linguistic research among Native Americans 9
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Sapir-Whorf Hypothesis:  “Strong version”:  Linguistic determinism Cultural thinking differences were direct results  of differences in their languages. “Weak version”: 
Background image of page 10
Image of page 11
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 08/15/2011 for the course PSYCH 166AC taught by Professor Peng during the Summer '11 term at University of California, Berkeley.

Page1 / 46

07152011_05_Cultures+and+Meaning+Systems -...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 11. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online