Cranford Notes

Cranford Notes - English 10C Welcome Click to edit Master...

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Click to edit Master subtitle style 8/15/11 English 10C Welcome
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8/15/11 AGENDA Meet your TA—Renee Hudson Overview of syllabus Reminder about Paper Topic #1—a close reading of either a passage from Elizabeth Gaskell’s Cranford (1853) or Wonderful Adventures of Mrs. Seacole in Many Lands (1857) Details of Paper Topic #1 are on class website at ccle.ucla.edu
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8/15/11 1832 Why does this class begin in 1832? Why does this date matter so much? Does this date have significant bearing on the literature of this era?
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8/15/11 The Reform Act: 1832 Reformed the electoral system of England and Wales. Expanded the number of men who could vote by roughly 60%. In order to vote, adult males over 21 had to fulfill a property qualification. One in six men out of a population of 14 million could now vote. Provided representation for new urban centers that had emerged during the Industrial Revolution. It eliminated parliamentary representation in “rotten boroughs.”
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8/15/11 Reform: The Political Watchword of the Victorian Period—1830s to 1880s
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8/15/11 Elizabeth Gaskell, née Cleghorn Stevenson Born 1810. Died 1865. Portrait, by George Richmond, dates from 1851
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8/15/11 Gaskell’s Life and Career Raised in Knutsford, Cheshire—a rural market town in the north-west of England, not far from the growing industrial metropolis of Manchester. In Cranford , the eponymous town is based on Knutsford, while Drumble is modeled on Manchester.
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8/15/11 Knutsford (March 2011) Since the early to mid nineteenth century, Knutsford has been a fairly well-off commuter town. It is close to Manchester. The town is next to Tatton Park, a historic estate, which was owned by the Egerton family from 1598 to 1958.
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8/15/11 Gaskell’s Politics and Religion Her family was Unitarian, with connections to other Unitarian families, such as the Wedgwoods. She married a Unitarian minister, William Gaskell, in 1832—the year of the Great Reform Bill. Historically, Unitarians were at the forefront of many radical causes, including campaigns against slavery. In 1832, she moved to Manchester, where she lived and wrote until her death in 1865, Although she did not know Friedrich Engels, author of The Condition of the Working Class in England (1845), they moved in similar circles.
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8/15/11 Gaskell’s Fictions Her first novel, Mary Barton —based on her knowledge of working with the industrial poor in Manchester— appeared in 1848. Cranford first published as a series of sketches in Charles Dickens’s magazine, Household Words , between late 1851 and the spring of 1853.
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8/15/11
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8/15/11
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8/15/11 Gaskell’s Fictions Cranford issued in a single volume in 1853. The single-volume text differs slightly from the one in Household Words . Ruth
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This note was uploaded on 08/15/2011 for the course ENGLISH 10 taught by Professor Bristow during the Spring '11 term at UCLA.

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Cranford Notes - English 10C Welcome Click to edit Master...

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