Seacole Lecture

Seacole Lecture - Mary Seacole This portrait of Mary...

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8/15/11 Mary Seacole This portrait of Mary Seacole dates from 1869. It was discovered in 2003. The National Portrait Gallery, London, has displayed it since 2008. Seacole is in her mid-60s here.
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8/15/11 Mary Seacole: Agenda The reasons why Seacole wrote and published her Wonderful Adventures . The significance of the title. The editor and the publisher of this autobiography. The genre of autobiography—its characteristics. The implied readership of Seacole’s narrative.
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8/15/11 Mary Seacole This image probably dates from the 1860s. It is either a “ carte de visite ” or a “cabinet card.” This type of photography became very popular in the second half of the nineteenth century. Note the medicines on the table, the mixing bowl, the medals, the neatly tied-back hair, and the neat, modest dress. Seacole’s pose assumes that she is dedicated to her professional work.
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8/15/11 Mary Seacole in Punch , 1857
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8/15/11 Mary Seacole in Punch , 1857
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8/15/11 Why Seacole Wrote Her Narrative To provide her with sums of money to defray her debts . To ensure that the public recognize her achievements as a self-sacrificing, loyal , and gifted British subject. To justify her skills as an enterprising businesswoman and a skilled nurse. To throw authoritative and intimate light on the Crimean War. To expose the horrors of American slavery and racial prejudice.
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8/15/11 Mary Seacole’s Wonderful The title—”wonderful” is inspirational, “adventures” sounds lively and exciting. Publisher—respected company based in London. Editor—leading war correspondent at the London Times . Dedication—to a senior military office who is “K.C.B.” Preface—learned reference (Anna
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8/15/11 Seacole’s “I” and Seacole’s “You” Seacole assumes a very strong awareness of, if not wish for intimacy with, her readers (13) Her readers, her narrative voice implies, are British, patriotic, white, literary, and educated. Seacole insists on her desire as a girl to take a voyage of the “homeward bound” ships sailing from Jamaica to England. Seacole, however, reminds readers that
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8/15/11 Seacole’s “I” and Seacole’s “You” She is partly descended from people enslaved by the British empire. (20- 21) Seacole insists that she has bonds with both slaves in America and the implicitly white Britons reading her book. In the course of her narrative, Seacole expresses considerable
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Seacole and autobiography The autobiographical subject involves a first person narrative voice that focuses on how it came to write about itself. In other words, autobiography involves a narrator writing about the events that led up the act of writing. Seacole’s “I” is acutely aware of the
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Seacole Lecture - Mary Seacole This portrait of Mary...

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