Tennyson Lecture

Tennyson Lecture - Alfred Tennyson (18091892) Tennyson was...

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8/15/11 Alfred Tennyson (1809- 1892) Tennyson was born in the village of Somersby, Lincolnshire, England. His father, a learned man, was the Rector of the local and adjacent parishes. Tennyson’s father had been disinherited by his own father. Tennyson was the fourth of twelve children. Mental illness and epilepsy afflicted several members of the family.
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8/15/11 Alfred Tennyson Somersby Trinity College,
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8/15/11 Alfred Tennyson Educated at a local grammar school. Matriculated at Trinity College, Cambridge in the fall of 1828. He joined his brother Charles and Frederick there. He met Arthur Henry Hallam (right) at the “Cambridge Apostles.”
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8/15/11 Tennyson’s Early Career Between 1833 and 1850 he drafted the lyrics included in In Memoriam . He published Poems (1832)—not very well received. Poems , two volumes (1842), contained revised versions of works in Poems (1832) plus new poems—very well received. Published The Princess: A Medley (1847)—a satirical poem about women’s rights (mixed reviews). Anonymous publication of In Memoriam on June 1, 1850 confirms his reputation as leading British poet. Later in June 1850 he marries Emily Sellwood. Tennyson becomes poet laureate in November 1850.
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8/15/11 Tennyson Laureate Tennyson performed his duties at laureate conscientiously. His famous poems as laureate include “Ode on the Death of the Duke of Wellington” (1852), “The Charge of the Light Brigade” (1854), and “Ode for the Opening of the International Exhibition” (1862). “The Charge of the Light Brigade” became one of the nation’s most recited poems. It told the story of military heroism and suffering that inspired paintings such as Balaclava (1876) by Elizabeth Butler (right).
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8/15/11 The Dedicatee of In Memoriam: Hallam was regarded as one of the most intellectually brilliant men of his generation. Educated at Eton College, he was the son of a leading historian (Henry Hallam). He was set to have a fine political career, like his Eton peer, W.E. Gladstone. Tennyson and Hallam developed a devoted friendship. Both men held similar Whig political views. Together, they traveled to the Pyrenees to defend democrats against the authoritarian Spanish monarchy. They also helped to extinguish fires ignited by “rick-burners” in the country outside Cambridge.
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8/15/11 Tennyson and Hallam Hallam, like Tennyson, wrote poetry— but he was also a critic. Hallam published an essay that defended Tennyson’s early poetry from the charge that it was “Cockney.” Many leading critics attacked Tennyson’s work because it seemed “effeminate” (too much like Keats, in In 1832, Hallam became engaged to Tennyson’s sister, Emily. This marriage would have
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Tennyson Lecture - Alfred Tennyson (18091892) Tennyson was...

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