Chapter 6 Summary - M06_BENN0885_05_SE_C06.qxd 7:57 AM Page...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chapter 6 Formation of Planetary Systems 183 the big picture Putting Chapter 6 into Context In this chapter, we’ve introduced the major features of our solar system and described the current scienti±c theory of its formation. We’ve seen how this theory explains the major features we observe and how it can be extended to other planetary systems. As you continue your study of the solar system, keep in mind the following “big picture” ideas: Our solar system is not a random collection of objects moving in random directions. Rather, it is highly organized, with clear patterns of motion and common traits among families of objects. We can explain the major features of our solar system with a theory that holds that the solar system formed from the gravitational col- lapse of an interstellar gas cloud. Most of the general features of the solar system were determined by processes that occurred very early in the solar system’s history, which began some years ago. Planet-forming processes are universal. Discoveries of planets around other stars have begun an exciting new era in planetary science. 4 1 2 billion summary of key concepts 6.1 A Brief Tour of the Solar System • What does the solar system look like? The planets are tiny compared to the distances between them. Our solar system consists of the Sun, the planets and their moons, and vast numbers of asteroids and comets. Each world has its own unique character, but there are many clear pat- terns among the worlds. 6.2 Clues to the Formation of Our Solar System • What features of our solar system provide clues to how it formed? Four major features provide clues: (1) The Sun, planets, and large moons generally rotate and orbit in a very organized way. (2) The eight of±cial planets divide clearly into two groups: terrestrial and jovian . (3) The solar system contains vast numbers of asteroids and comets, some large enough to qualify as dwarf planets. (4) There are some notable exceptions to these general patterns. • What theory best explains the features of
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

Page1 / 2

Chapter 6 Summary - M06_BENN0885_05_SE_C06.qxd 7:57 AM Page...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online