Chapter 6(Formation of Solar System)

Chapter 6(Formation of Solar System) - Chapter 6 Formation...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–31. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chapter 6 Formation of Planetary Systems Our Solar System and Beyond
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
6.1 A Brief Tour of the Solar System Our goals for learning: What does the solar system look like?
Background image of page 2
The solar system exhibits clear patterns of composition and motion. These patterns are far more important and interesting than numbers, names, and other trivia.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Planets are very tiny compared to distances between them.
Background image of page 4
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 6
Over 99.9% of solar system’s mass Made mostly of H/He gas (plasma) Converts 4 million tons of mass into energy each second Sun
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Made of metal and rock; large iron core Desolate, cratered; long, tall, steep cliffs V ery hot and very cold: 425°C (day), –170°C (night) Mercury
Background image of page 8
Nearly identical in size to Earth; surface hidden by clouds Hellish conditions due to an extreme greenhouse effect Even hotter than Mercury: 470°C, day and night Venus
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
RADAR Image of Volcanoes on Venus
Background image of page 10
An oasis of life The only surface liquid water in the solar system A surprisingly large moon Earth and Moon to scale (size, not distance) Earth
Background image of page 11

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Looks almost Earth-like, but don’t go without a spacesuit! Giant volcanoes, a huge canyon, polar caps, and more Water flowed in the distant past; could there have been life? Mars
Background image of page 12
Background image of page 13

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 14
Background image of page 15

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Much farther from Sun than inner planets Mostly H/He; no solid surface 300 times more massive than Earth Many moons, rings Jupiter
Background image of page 16
Jupiter’s moons can be as interesting as planets themselves, especially Jupiter’s four Galilean moons Io (shown here): Active volcanoes all over Europa: Possible subsurface ocean Ganymede: Largest moon in solar system Callisto: A large, cratered “ice ball”
Background image of page 17

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 18
Saturn Giant and gaseous like Jupiter Spectacular rings Many moons, including cloudy Titan Cassini spacecraft currently studying it
Background image of page 19

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Rings are NOT solid; they are made of countless small chunks of ice and rock, each orbiting like a tiny moon. Artist’s conception
Background image of page 20
Background image of page 21

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Smaller than Jupiter/Saturn; much larger than Earth Made of H/He gas and hydrogen compounds (H 2 O, NH 3 , CH 4 ) Extreme axis tilt Moons and rings Uranus
Background image of page 22
Background image of page 23

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Similar to Uranus (except for axis tilt) Many moons (including Triton) Neptune
Background image of page 24
Background image of page 25

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 26
Pluto and Eris Much smaller than other planets Icy, comet-like composition Pluto’s moon Charon is similar in size to Pluto
Background image of page 27

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
What have we learned? What does the solar system look like? Planets are tiny compared to the distances between them. Each world has its own character, but there are many clear patterns.
Background image of page 28
What features of our solar system provide clues to how it formed?
Background image of page 29

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
All large bodies in the solar system orbit in the same direction and in nearly the same plane. Most also
Background image of page 30
Image of page 31
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 96

Chapter 6(Formation of Solar System) - Chapter 6 Formation...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 31. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online