Thermo Project #1 Assumptions

Thermo Project#1 - liquid respectively Allows for maximum performance of the refrigeration cycle and allows the equations to be easily solved •

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Kyle Zibrowski Dr. Hagge ME 332 9/30/2010 Thermo Assumptions Phi_exit = 35%: Each humidifier has a setting to choose the exit relative humidity. This value was chosen because it was a standard value on nearly all dehumidifiers. Compared to the overall work required to run the compressor as well as the heat transfer in the evaporator and condenser the Q_dot_out and W_dot_in of the fan is negligible. Compressor is 100% efficient: No values were given that pertained to the efficiency of the compressor, and given 100% efficiency the energy equation can be easily solved. P_in = 1 atm: Standard atmospheric pressure m_dot_in = m_dot_air: Because m_dot_vapor <1% of m_dot_in it is a reasonable assumption to say m_dot_in = m_dot_air in order to solve all equations States of 5&7 in Refrigeration cycle are at saturated vapor and saturated
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Unformatted text preview: liquid, respectively: Allows for maximum performance of the refrigeration cycle and allows the equations to be easily solved. • The evaporator and condenser are an insulated system: Only heat transfer that happens is between the air flow and the cold or hot refrigerant • P_low = 2: Needed a start point for the refrigerant, seemed like a standard operating pressure of R22 • Overall pressure is constant: No significant pressure difference happens because of this process (the fan only creates a very minor one extremely close to the blades) so these small changes can be ignored. • T_2 = 45 deg F: Purely assumed number. Seemed like a reasonable assumption. • Phi_2 = 100%: Temperature drop causes the partial pressure of vapor to fall to the saturation point....
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This note was uploaded on 08/18/2011 for the course ME 332 taught by Professor Feve during the Spring '08 term at Iowa State.

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