miseenscene - M is e-e n-S cn e Mise-en-Scne (lit. in the...

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Mise-en-Scène
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Mise-en-Scène (lit. “in the frame”) – elements of the scene put in place before the camera rolls – Setting – Properties – Costume/Makeup – Performance/Acting – Lighting
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• The elements of mise-en-scene do not work independently • How do these elements connect the viewer to the time, place and story? • How do they establish character and theme? • How do they characterize genre?
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• Realism vs. Formalism – Realism refers to the extent to which a movie creates a truthful depiction of society or another dimension in life – physical reality is the source of all of the raw materials in the film. – Formalism refers to stylistic flamboyance. The director is concerned with expressing their unabashedly subjective experience of reality, not how others may see it.
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Setting • Spatial area where the film takes place – It is more than just a backdrop - Symbolic extension of the theme and characterization • Verisimilitude – The quality of fictional representation
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miseenscene - M is e-e n-S cn e Mise-en-Scne (lit. in the...

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