Paper-Review_ITPM - AGILE
PROJECT
MANAGEMENT
 
 
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Unformatted text preview: AGILE
PROJECT
MANAGEMENT
 
 
 REVIEW
BY:
 Anand
Gunasekar
 Bachelor
of
Computer
Science
(Software
Engineering)
Hons
 Faculty
of
Information
Technology
 University
Industrial
of
Selangor
 anand.gunasekar@hotmail.com
 
 Yoga
Kumar
Nadarajah
 Bachelor
of
Computer
Science
(Software
Engineering)
Hons
 Faculty
of
Information
Technology
 University
Industrial
of
Selangor
 prem_boys2007@yahoo.com
 
 
 INTRODUCTION
 
 Methodologies
impose
a
disciplined
process
upon
software
development
with
the
aim
of
making
software
 development
more
predictable
and
more
efficient.
We
can
consider
a
methodology
containing
ten
basic
elements:
 techniques,
 tools,
 deliverables,
 teams,
 roles,
 skills,
 activities
 standards,
 quality
 measures
 and
 project
 values.
 A
 specific
 methodology
 is
 needed
 depending
 on
 the
 project
 the
 size,
 criticality,
 scope
 and
 optimized
 quality.
 In
 recent
 years,
 Agile
 development
 methodologies
 have
 also
 been
 increasing
 in
 popularity.
 Thus
 many
 such
 Agile
 Methods
have
been
introduced
over
the
last
decade,
including
Crystal,
 extreme
Programming
(XP),
SCRUM,
FDD,
 rapid
application
development
(RAD),
and
Dynamic
System
Development
Methodology
(DSDM)
.
 
 
 
 
 REVIEW
BODY
 
 Agile
 methodology
 is
 approaches
 that
 were
 developed
 based
 on
 the
 rule
 that
 suits
 the
 best
 way
 to
 verify
 a
 system
 is
 to
 deliver
 working
 versions
 to
 the
 customer,
 and
 then
 updates
 it
 according
 to
 their
 notes.
 These
 methodologies
are
basically
on
four
simple
principles.
 
 • First,
the
 main
objective
is
to
develop
software
that
satisfies
the
customers,
through
continuous
delivering
 of
working
software,
and
getting
feedback
from
customers
about
it.
 
 • The
 second
 principle
 is
 accepting
 changes
 in
 requirements
 at
 any
 development
 stage,
 so
 that
 customers
 would
feel
more
comfortable
with
the
development
process.
 
 • The
 third
 principle
 is
 the
 cooperation
 between
 the
 developers
 and
 the
 customers
 (business
 people)
 on
 a
 daily
basis
throughout
the
project
development.
 
 • The
last
principle
is
developing
on
a
test‐driven
basis;
that
is
to
write
test
prior
to
writing
code.
A
test
suite
 is
run
on
the
application
after
any
code
change.
 
 Agility
in
short
means
to
strip
away
as
much
of
the
heaviness,
commonly
associated
with
traditional
software
 development
methodologies,
as
possible,
in
order
to
promote
quick
response
to
changing
environments,
changes
 in
 user
 requirements,
 accelerate
 project
 deadlines,
 and
 the
 meet
 the
 user
 needs.
 Agile
 methodologies
 prefer
 software
development
over
documentation
because
it
is
based
on
people‐oriented
rather
than
process‐oriented.
 
 
 The
basic
characteristics
of
this
approach
in
the
Project
Management
are
these:
 
 • Assume
simplicity
 
 As
the
project
evolves
it
should
be
assumed
that
the
simplest
solution
is
the
best
solution.
Overbuilding
the
system
 or
any
artifact
of
the
project
must
be
avoided.
 
 • Embrace
change
 
 Since
the
stakeholder
understanding
of
the
requirements
will
change
over
time.
Project
stakeholders
themselves
 may
change
as
the
project
makes
progress.
Project
stakeholders
may
change
their
point
of
view,
which
in
turn
will
 change
the
goals
and
success
criteria
of
the
project
management
effort.
 
 • Incremental
change
 
 The
 pressure
 to
 get
 it
 right
 the
 first
 time
 can
 overwhelm
 the
 best
 project
 manager.
 Instead
 of
 futilely
 trying
 to
 develop
an
all‐encompassing
project
plan
from
the
start,
put
a
stake
in
the
ground
by
developing
a
small
portion
of
 the
 system,
 or
 even
 a
 high–level
 model
 of
 a
 larger
 portion
 of
 the
 system,
 and
 evolves
 this
 portion
 overtime.
 Or
 simply
discard
it
when
you
no
longer
need
it
in
an
incremental
manner.
 
 • Maximize
stakeholder
value
 
 The
 project
 stakeholders
 are
 investing
 resources
 (time,
 money,
 facilities)
 to
 have
 a
 system
 deployed
 that
 meets
 their
needs.
Stakeholders
expect
that
their
investment
to
be
applied
in
the
best
way.
 
 • Rapid
feedback
 
 The
 time
 between
 an
 action
 and
 the
 feedback
 on
 that
 action
 must
 be
 minimized.
 Work
 closely
 with
 the
 stakeholders,
 to
 understand
 the
 requirements,
 to
 analyze
 those
 requirements,
 and
 develop
 an
 actionable
 plan,
 which
provides
numerous
opportunities
for
feedback.
 
 • Working
software
is
the
primary
goal
of
the
project.
 
 The
 goal
 of
 any
 software
 project
 management
 is
 to
 produce
 software
 that
 meets
 the
 needs
 of
 the
 project
 stakeholders.
The
goal
is
not
to
produce
extraneous
documentation,
management
 artifacts
or
models
of
these
artifacts.
 
 
 
 
 
 CONCLUSION
 Getting
projects
 faster
is
a
universal
desire
of
 management.
The
reality
of
project
management
 is
that
we
 never
 really
 have
 the
 time
 to
 create
 perfect
 plans,
 to
 analyze
 all
 the
 options.
 Agile
 approach
 provides
 some
 methods
 for
project
management
to
become
more
effective
and
these
methods
need
to
be
taken
and
 customized
 to
the
unique
business
environment
 of
the
project.
However,
Agile
Methods
are
not
appropriate
for
all
projects.
A
 project
 manager
 must
 consider
 the
 characteristics
 of
 the
 project
 to
 ensure
 that
 an
 Agile
 Method
 is
 appropriate.
 The
impact
on
the
people,
the
process,
and
challenges
must
all
be
considered.
Project
managers
should
consider
 its
 usage
 for
 such
 projects
 assuming
 that
 they
 have
 a
 team
 capable
 of
 using
 it
 and
 can
 implement
 the
 required
 processes.
Otherwise,
more
traditional
approaches
may
be
more
appropriate.
 
 
 
 
 REFERENCES
 
 Constanța‐Nicoleta
(2005),

Agile
Software
Project
Management
Methodologies,
Economy
Informatics
1(4),
27‐31.
 
 
 Malik
Hneif
&
Siew
H.C.,
(2009),
Review
of
Agile
Methodologies
in
software
development,

International
Journal
of
 Research
and
Reviews
in
Applied
Sciences,
Volume
1,
1‐8
 
 
 Michael
C.
&
Shawn
B.
(2005),
The
Impact
of
Agile
Methods
on
Software
Project
Management,
Proceedings
of
the
 12th
IEEE
International
Conference
and
Workshops
on
the
Engineering
of
Computer‐Based
Systems.
 
 Naresh
Kumar
Nagwani
&
Pradeep
Singh
(2009).
An
Agile
Methodology
Based
Model
for
Change‐

 
 Oriented
Software
Engineering
,

International
Journal
of
Recent
Trends
in
Engineering,
Volume
1,
128‐132.
 StephenA.
L.(2009),
Improvisation
and
agile
project
management:
a
comparative
consideration
,
519‐535.

 Retrieved
from
Emerald

database.
 
 Nayan
Jyothi
Kar
(2006),
Adopting
Agile
Methodologies
of
Software
Development,
SETLabs
Briefing,
Volume
4
,1‐8
 
 ...
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This note was uploaded on 08/17/2011 for the course CS 102 taught by Professor Halimah during the Summer '11 term at International Islamic University Malaysia.

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