The History of Hinduism

The History of Hinduism - The History of Hinduism By:...

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The History of Hinduism By: Joanne Petrie Andrea lynch University of Phoenix HUM/130 8/5/11
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The history of Hinduism is the dominant religion of India that emphasizes dharma with it’s resulting ritual and social observances and often mystical contemplation and ascetic practices. Dharma is an individual’s duty fulfilled by observance of custom or law in Hinduism and Buddhism. The history can be traced back to about 1500 bce and its evidence of Hinduism’s early significant events, conditions, and traits of one’s earlier life is obtained from a comparative religion and philology and from archaeology. Hinduism is the oldest living religion on Earth and other parts of the world, through its rituals and its visual and performing arts which helped played a significant role in its transmission for more than 1,000 years. Hinduism in the early 21 st century, had about one billion followers of a leader, party, or profession worldwide and was the religion of India’s population at about 80%. Despite its worldwide global presence, it was best understood by its many distinctive regional public demonstrations of power and purpose. Gradually the term ‘Hindu”, was used by the residents of India to distinguish themselves from the Turks and became religious rather than ethnic, geographic, or cultural distinctions. Hinduism in India dates back to late Neolithic in the early Harappan period of (5500-2600 BCE), and the practices and beliefs of the pre-classical era of (1500-500 BCE) were called the “historical Vedic religion”. Scriptures Scriptures in Hinduism are based on a body of writings considered sacred or authoritative or to gather or pile up a treasury of spiritual laws discovered by different persons in different times. In current Hindu beliefs, and the post-Vedic the scriptures are not typically interpreted or re- produced word for word. They were transmitted orally in a verse form to aid memorization, for many decades before they were written down. Over the past centuries, a mature or venerable
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man of sound judgment who was wise through his reflections and experience refined the teachings and expanded the body of principles, rules, standards, or norms and the ethics and metaphorical meanings derived from them. The two classes of Hindu scriptures are called Shruti and Smriti texts. Shruti means (that which is heard), and refers to the Vedas, and comes from the earliest record of the Hindu scriptures, and are the eternal truths revealed to the ancient sages and do not associate the creation of the Vedas with a God or person. They are thought of as the laws of a spiritual world, and the spiritual truths of the Vedas are eternal, so that they are continued to be expressed in many new ways. The Smritis or Smriti is collectively called the (memory) and illustrates Hindu ideas through
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This note was uploaded on 08/17/2011 for the course HUM 130 taught by Professor Georgegreaves during the Summer '09 term at University of Phoenix.

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The History of Hinduism - The History of Hinduism By:...

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