Organziation - TAB L E O F CO N T E N TS MOTIVATION A...

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Unformatted text preview: TAB L E O F CO N T E N TS MOTIVATION A CRUISE WITH THE BOSS? A BOX OF TIMBITS? TIME TO GET SERIOUS ABOUT REWARDING EMPLOYEES Barbara Moses . The Globe and Mail . Toronto, Ont.: Apr 28, 2010 . pg. B.16 2010 CTVglobemedia Publishing Inc. All Rights Reserved. As organizations begin to recover from the recession, picking the right way to reward a job well done, and avoiding common pitfalls, will be critical to repairing wounds to morale and restoring staff confidence and loyalty [email protected] A client was selected as one of the top performers in her organization. Her reward: a one-week Caribbean cruise - with company executives. It hardly pleased her. In fact, she was aghast. The prospect of going on a cruise, especially with senior management, was her idea of hell. "I don't like schmoozing, I don't like feeling trapped. Why couldn't they just give me the money?" she said. She went on the cruise - but she spent much of the week working in her stateroom. Another person I know recently celebrated 25 years with her employer. To honour her long service, her boss brought in a box of Timbits. The woman felt insulted. She said she would have preferred to receive nothing rather than "a piddling box of doughnuts." As these stories illustrate, employers may have the best intentions when recognizing employees, but it is easy for so-called rewards to go awry. Getting them right is especially important now. The past year and a half has not been a very rewarding period for employees, who saw traditional incentives of salary increases, bonuses and training and development replaced with income cuts, shrunken career opportunities, job anxiety and increased workload without compensation. Indeed, judging from recent employee survey results that clients have told me about, even rewards that don't cost anything, such as compliments for work well done, have been in short supply. As organizations start to recover from the recession, picking the right ways to reward employees, and avoiding common pitfalls, will be critical to repairing wounds to morale and restoring staff confidence and loyalty. Rewards come in many forms, from the extrinsic - monetary bonuses, events such as dinners, conferences or speeches, and praise - to the intrinsic - the internal pleasure of having completed something in a way that met personal needs, whether by having contributed to an important project or executed a piece of work to the highest standards. Some extrinsic rewards, such as money and appreciation, are valued by almost everyone. But even these must be tailored correctly to the situation and the person, or they can backfire. Take appreciation for a job well done. A professional who has been doing the same type of work for many years knows when he or she is doing a good job. A compliment for work people can do with their eyes closed can be irritating and feel empty. In order for the praise to be truly motivating and appreciated, it needs to be tied to something the person values and is proud of.appreciated, it needs to be tied to something the person values and is proud of....
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This note was uploaded on 08/18/2011 for the course ELE 335 taught by Professor Hawkins during the Spring '09 term at Adrian College.

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Organziation - TAB L E O F CO N T E N TS MOTIVATION A...

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