Polymer00046 - determining the mixing torque. Before adding...

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35 4% T-SiO 2 was relatively small. After adding the crosslinking agent, the difference was remarkably increased, implying that there existed another factor causing the torque difference on the initial curing stage. This factor was believed to be the amino-silane coupling agent used to treat silica. Besides peroxide curing agent, diamines can also cure fluoroelastomers (Beck, et al. 2009). The amino groups on the surface of T-SiO 2 took part in the curing reaction, therefore, T-SiO 2 actually acted as a secondary crosslinking agent for the elastomer during the mixing. This additional crosslinking effect of T-SiO 2 led to the enlarged difference of the mixing torque. Figure2.2 (b) shows that the nanofiller type also played an important role in
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Unformatted text preview: determining the mixing torque. Before adding the crosslinking agent, the neat fluoroelastomer (neat-FC2260) exhibited the lowest mixing torque. The modified clay (FS-clay) filled FC2260 showed the highest mixing torque before crosslinking. After adding the crosslinking agent, the order of the mixing torque was completely different. The treated graphite (T-G) filled FC2260 showed the lowest mixing torque, implying T-G hindered crosslinking reaction of the FC2260. In contrast, the T-SiO 2 filled FC2260 exhibited the highest mixing torque due to the role of T-SiO 2 as a secondary crosslinking agent for the elastomer. Following T-SiO 2 , untreated silica (UT-SiO 2 ) and FS-clay led to the second and third highest mixing torque....
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