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Comic Spread - sdfghjklzxcvbnmqwer t yuiopasdfghjk Comics...

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asdfghjklzxcvbnmqwertyuiopasdfghjk Comics and Animation Final Paper 12/8/2010 Sabine C Justilien
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The verbal, visual, spatial and temporal relationships of comics continually overlap each other. This creates a dynamic piece that exploits and expands on the use of pictures and words versus strictly verbal narratives or visual pieces. Barks, Crumb and Cole in their respective two- page spreads have elaborate workings of time and positioning of comic traits that magnify the true artistry of this literary genre. A great difference between this medium and books or film is that every single shadow, word, position of word bubbles and shape of frame is absolutely necessary in creating an idea of reality within that comic. Light In A Letter to Santa , the concept of time during and between frames is one of the main attractions. On Duck St, the lamp post seems to illuminate the deserted intersection of a city neighborhood, and the faces seen in the windows reinforce the grandiosity of the late night escapade that Scrooge McDuck and Donald Duck have initiated. The value of light, or lack thereof, in this two page spread is illustrated through shadows and
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Sabine C Justilien voids in the scene. The police car in frame 11 has a blaring police light, the only real ‘focused’ and visually ‘tangible’ source of light in the two pages. In the first frame of confrontation, the building, later to be seen as brick inlaid, is contrasted against a dark street, reinforcing the lateness. The action shots provide the only illuminating factor in this case. In between frames, the gutter plays an integral role as far as the transposing of each action in between frames. In frames 9 through 11, the largest frame to the police scene, the fight is assumed to be continuing although there are no more visuals of the actual conflict. It is implied that meanwhile while the perspectives change from one scene to another, there was a phone call made to the police and the Duck’s were arrested. How long did the fight actually last? Cumulatively, one is certain that the event had to have taken place in one night but the amount of minutes of hours is in question. The passing of time is apparent, but was it seconds or minutes that transpired in between the blows? Jack Cole’s True Crime provided a very disjointed timeline in which the plot took place. Initially, I assumed that the entire spread took place in 3
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one night. But after reviewing it, it is clear that the main thrust of the plot occurs as a flashback, then concluding at the present day. One of the mobsters makes a reference to the kidnapping taking place in a week from that date. How long in the past did this flashback moment take place relative to the current plot? In the present day scene where Mary is smoking on the bed, time sudden elapses quicker than in the previous frames. The action-response to Tony expresses an inquisitive use of time paired with action. In A Letter to Santa, there was more definite pairing of sound cues as far as when Donald WAM-ed Scrooge. The sound is
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