11. The structure of Nigerian Pidgin[1]

11. The structure of Nigerian Pidgin[1] - Nigerian Pidgin...

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Nigerian Pidgin
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The structure of Nigerian Pidgin Phonology: consonants / ʒ / occurs only in varieties that have been influenced by standard English. E.g. measure is [m ɛʃɔ ] in the mesolect but [m ] ɛʒə in the acrolect. θ and ð do not exist in the language. Hence thin is pronounced [tin] and then is pronounced [d n] ɛ /kp/ and /gb/ occur in a few words that are onomatopoeic (sound words) E.g. gbagbati ‘unnecessary show of power or excessive rascality’ kamkpe ‘real good’ kpoi ‘fantastic’
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vowels Nigerian Pidgin has a seven-vowel system: /i, e, , ɛ a, , ɔ o, u/ This means ‘sick’ is not pronounced /s ɪ k/ but [sik], ‘foot’ is not pronounced /f ʋ t/ but [fut], A number of words of English origin which have diphthongs are pronounced as vowel plus approximant. Examples are: is [prawd] ‘proud’ [smayl] ‘smile’ There is automatic nasalization of vowels that precede /m/ and /n/ in standard English: ‘corn’ = [k ɔ̃ ] ‘run’ = [r ɔ̃ ] ‘win’ = [wĩ] ‘him, his = [ĩ] ‘inside’ = [ĩnsae] ‘enter’ = h ɛ̃ nta ‘hungry = [h ɔ̃ ŋgri]
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Syllable structure Clusters of two consonants are allowed at the beginning or end of a word: Cr sequences are the most common syllable-initial cluster /krai/ ‘cry’ /broda/ ‘brother’ In some varieties, the clusters are broken by a vowel. /spun/ [sip ũ ] – [sp ũ ] /stop/ [sit ɔ p] – [st ɔ p] /klia/ [kilia] – [klia]
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The use of pitch Nigerian Pidgin utilizes pitch for intonation along lines similar to what English does. [i de kom] ‘he is coming’ It also utilizes pitch in ways which affect the meaning of utterances. However this does not qualify it to be a tone language because it does not require that pitch be significant on every syllable, as is the case in tonal languages. /sis
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This note was uploaded on 08/19/2011 for the course SSA 4930 taught by Professor Essegbey during the Spring '11 term at University of Florida.

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11. The structure of Nigerian Pidgin[1] - Nigerian Pidgin...

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