LauerTL2009 - Tribol Lett DOI 10.1007/s11249-009-9514-7 1...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
UNCORRECTED PROOF ORIGINAL PAPER 1 2 High-Temperature Vapor Phase Lubrication Using Carbonaceous 3 Gases 4 Nicolas Argibay James H. Keith Brandon A. Krick 5 D. W. Hahn Gerald R. Bourne W. Gregory Sawyer 6 Received: 5 August 2009 / Accepted: 25 August 2009 7 Ó Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009 8 Abstract Following the pioneering work of Prof. James 9 Lauer, the ability to provide continuous solid lubrication 10 through vapor phase delivery of carbonaceous gases has 11 been successfully demonstrated on a pin-on-disk contact at 12 the temperatures of 650 ° C. Results from tribological 13 experiments under 2 N normal load and 50 mm/s sliding 14 speed showed an over 20 9 reduction in friction coefficient. 15 The samples were silicon nitride (pin) versus CMSX-4 16 (disk) and the experiments when run in a nitrogen envi- 17 ronment with an acetylene admixtures. Two repeat exper- 18 iments gave average friction coefficients of l = 0.03 and 19 l = 0.02. The process was robust and provided low fric- 20 tion for the entire 500 m of sliding. Using focused ion- 21 beam milling, high-resolution transmission electron 22 microscopy, and confocal Raman spectroscopy, the 23 resulting solid lubricant was found to be oriented micro- 24 crystalline graphite. 25 26 Keywords Vapor phase lubrication ± 27 High-temperature tribology ± Solid lubrication 28 1 Introduction 29 High-temperature lubrication continues to be a limitation 30 for a wide variety of applications. In power generation, for 31 example, there are tremendous efficiency gains that can be 32 realized only if the operating temperatures are raised. The 33 thermal limits of conventional lubrication strategies remain 34 a daunting obstacle to these design concepts. As outline by 35 Lauer and Bunting [ 1 ]: 36 Several possibilities exist for high temperature 37 lubrication. They are each listed here with a major 38 drawback which needs to be overcome. 39 Synthetic fluids: 500 ° C maximum use temperature 40 Solid lubricants: replenishment 41 Molten glass: Solid at room temperature 42 43 Only solid lubricants show any promise of operating 44 from ambient to above 500 ° C. 45 Solid lubricants would have to be replenished in order 46 to provide long life and reliable operation at high 47 temperatures. Various types of replenishment systems 48 have been suggested, and they include such methods 49 as: 50 1. Stick or Powder Feed 51 2. Gaseous or Liquid Suspension feed 52 3. Incorporation in pockets or retainers 53 4. Gaseous materials which react at the surface. 54 An example of this last method, which is the subject 55 of this paper, would be to chemically form the 56 lubricant directly on the bearing surfaces from a 57 gaseous feed material. 58 Lauer’s pioneering work with vapor phase lubrication 59 began with a hypothesis that the exposure of the nascent 60 surfaces through wear would catalyze reactions with the 61 ambient environment. In the 1988 paper by Lauer and 62 Bunting [ 1 ], they were able to show that friction coeffi- 63 cients as a low as l = 0.10 were able to be achieved at A1 N. Argibay ± J. H. Keith ± B. A. Krick ± D. W. Hahn ± A2 W. G. Sawyer ( & )
Image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern