wtc2005_63560 - Proceedings of the : World Tribology...

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1 Copyright © #### by ASME Proceedings of the : World Tribology Congress III Washington Hilton, Washington DC WTC2005-63560 OBJECTIVE LIFETIME DESIGN OF ORTHOPAEDIC JOINT REPLACEMENTS: ARE WE THERE YET? S.A. Banks Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering University of Florida Gainesville Florida 32611 B.J. Fregly Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering University of Florida Gainesville Florida 32611 M.K. Harman The BioMotion Foundation Palm Beach Florida M.A. Hamilton Dept. of Mech. and Aero. Eng. University of Florida Gainesville Florida 32611 W.G. Sawyer Dept. of Mech. and Aero. Eng. University of Florida Gainesville Florida 32611 ABSTRACT A computation methodology to objectively predict the lifetime of orthopaedic joint replacements has been developed over the past 5 years. This methodology relies on accurate definitions of the joint kinematics, loads, and contract pressure coupled with experimentally determined wear rates. The validation process makes use of a joint retrieval program at the BioMotion Foundation. INTRODUCTION Implanted hip and knee joint replacements are now used in approximately one million surgical procedures each year in the U.S. First introduced in the late 1950’s, these devices have evolved to provide excel-lent relief of arthritic pain and reasonably good durability (10-15 years or more is common). Ironically, the success of joint replacements – which were originally meant to keep people out of wheelchairs and relieve their pain – now presents the greatest challenge: These devices are being implanted with increasing frequency in younger and more active patients who expect their treatment to provide superior mechanical function AND to last their lifetimes. Currently, about 10% of joint replacement surgeries are performed to replace another implant which has failed for mechanical, surgical, materials, and/or other reasons. As Baby- Boomers become joint replacement candidates, it is clear that reducing device/design related failures could yield substantial cost saving and quality of life improvements.
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This note was uploaded on 08/22/2011 for the course EGM 4313 taught by Professor Mei during the Spring '08 term at University of Florida.

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wtc2005_63560 - Proceedings of the : World Tribology...

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