GreekMythology - Greek Mythology, Monsters and Exotic...

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Greek Mythology, Monsters and Exotic Worlds, Part I HOMER AND STANLEY KUBRICK’S 2001: A SPACE ODYSSEY
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You can’t have an Odyssey without an Iliad The Iliad is the story of the Trojan War – a long, bloody conflict lasting ten years. How did Troy finally fall?
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The Trojan Horse Odysseus gets all the credit for the Trojan Horse, which finally allows the Greeks to capture Troy, thus setting off the epic cycle of myths surrounding the return (or dispersal) of the heroes of the war (eg. Menelaus, Diomedes, Aeneas) Vergil’s famous line: quidquid id est, timeo Danaos et dona ferentes The horse appears as a gift to the Trojans, but a gift fraught with dangers (keep this theme in mind when we get to Kubrick)
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The Odyssey in 1500 Words Or Less 1. Odysseus visits the Lotus-Eaters. Where were they going again? 1. Our hero visits the land of Polyphemus. In a fit of pique, he decides to tell the Cyclopes his real name, thereby bringing down the wrath of Poseidon upon him and his men. 1. Aeolus, king of the winds, gives Odysseus enough wind to get him where he’s going. His companions open the bag at the wrong time and get blown off course. 1. Odysseus visits the Laistrygones, thereby making his men lunch. I mean, they REALLY became lunch.
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Our Hero Soldiers On 1. Odysseus ends up on Circe’s island. With a little help from moly , he saves his men from a life of swine. 6.
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This note was uploaded on 08/23/2011 for the course CLA 3504 taught by Professor Kapparis during the Spring '11 term at University of Florida.

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GreekMythology - Greek Mythology, Monsters and Exotic...

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