MuscleW11.Revision1-11.pptx

MuscleW11.Revision1-11.pptx - Muscle 1, 2 & 3 Outline...

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1/22/11 1 Muscle 1, 2 & 3 Outline 1. Concept : Muscle Tissue Generates Force through Chemical and Physical Interaction between Contractile Proteins. 2. Three Types of Muscle – Skeletal, Smooth and Cardiac Muscle 3. Structure of Skeletal Muscle Tissue 4. Organization of Contractile Proteins in Skeletal, Cardiac and Smooth Muscle — Sarcomere as the Force Generating Unit in Skeletal and Cardiac Muscle. 5. Molecular Structure of Contractile Proteins — Actin and Associated Regulatory Proteins in Skeletal, Cardiac and Smooth Muscle, and Myosin 6. Neuromuscular Transmission – Events from Action Potential Nerve to Generation of Action Potential in Skeletal Muscle 7. Excitation-Contraction Coupling Skeletal Muscle – sequence of events from skeletal muscle action potential generation to cross-bridge formation and cross-bridge cycling with termination of Excitation- Contraction Coupling with re-uptake of Ca into sarcoplasmic reticulum. 8. Concept : Contractile Energy Dissipation in Sacromere Shortening . What determines the available contractile energy? Muscle Physiology: Chapter 8. Events in Neuromuscular Transmission: Fig. 7-6
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1/22/11 2 Muscle 1, 2 & 3 Outline, continued 9. Concept: Sarcomere Shortening and Force Generation Partitioned Tension Development &, once tension exceeds load, shortening of the whole muscle and movement of the load. 10. Types of Skeletal Muscle Contraction: Isotonic & Isometric 11. Model & Graphs for Isotonic and Isometric Contractions showing Sarcomere Length, Tension, Whole Muscle Length for Isotonic and Isometric Contractions 12. Contractile Properties of Whole Muscle Relationship between Tension and External Shortening of Whole Muscle for an Isotonic Contraction. Muscle (Sarcomere) Length – Tension Relationship Force (Tension) – Velocity of Shortening Definition Twitch Tension & Refractory Properties of Motor Nerve and Skeletal Muscle. Affect of Stimulation Frequency on Tension
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1/22/11 3 Muscle 1, 2 & 3 Outline, Continued 13. Grading Force Muscle Contraction through Nerve Stimulation Concept of the Motor Unit Motor Unit Size & Force Temporal Summation – Stimulation Frequency and Force of Contraction. Spatial Summation – Recruitment of Additional Motor Units; Recruitment of more sarcomeres Size Principle in Recruitment of Motor Neurons in Vivo. Size Principle in Recruitment of Motor Neurons with Electrical Stimulation of Motor Neurons using a Stimulator. 14. Overview Excitation – Contraction Coupling Cardiac Muscle 15. Excitation – Contraction Coupling Smooth Muscle
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1/22/11 4 Muscle 1, 2 & 3 Types of Muscle Tissue Fig. 8-1, P. 258
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1/22/11 5 Muscle 1, 2 & 3 All Muscle Tissues Contain the Contractile Proteins, Actin & Myosin + Regulatory Proteins that Determine Interaction of Actin & Myosin Types of Muscle Tissue & Their Properties Skeletal or Striated Muscle Voluntary Movement Requires Motor Neural Input for Contraction Striated appearance – array of actin-myosin myofiliments within each muscle fiber Smooth Muscle Lines Hollow Organs
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This note was uploaded on 08/21/2011 for the course NPB 101 taught by Professor Fuller,charles/goldberg,jack during the Winter '08 term at UC Davis.

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MuscleW11.Revision1-11.pptx - Muscle 1, 2 & 3 Outline...

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