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Extra Credit SOC101

Extra Credit SOC101 - boss should not confront people like...

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Fight Club Extra Credit Fight Club and the Conflict Theory The movie fight club is a very interesting movie. There are many different sociological concepts that are shown and discussed throughout the movie. One of the main sociology theories that makes its way into the movie is the conflict theory. Conflict theory states that a society or organization functions so that each individual participant and it’s groups struggle to maximize their benefits, which inevitably contributes to social change in such categories as politics and social classes. The most prevalent example of this in the movie is between the narrator, played by Edward Norton, and his boss Richard Chelser. Their interaction on a daily basis is one of conflict. I very good example of this is when his boss finds a flyer on the copy machine with the rules of the fight club. The boss confronts him and then the narrator proceeds to go off on a long speech of why his
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Unformatted text preview: boss should not confront people like he does. Then there is of course the classic example between the narrator and his alter ego Tyler Durden. Probably the best example of their conflict is when the narrator figures out what Tyler has been planning and then he tries to stop it. The narrator knows that was is about to happen is wrong and he is willing to do anything to stop it but his alter ego is too strong and un-stoppable. Lastly an example of the conflict theory is the fight club itself. The fight club starts as something innocent for people to get away from their everyday lives but as the movie goes on the club grows into more. The fight club becomes a revolution. This is a prime example of the conflict theory because the conflict is what is promoting change....
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