Lecture 9 - Lecture9 :Hypothesis LearningObjectives...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–7. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Lecture 9 Statistical Inference: Hypothesis  Statistical Inference: Hypothesis  Testing for Single Populations Testing for Single Populations
Image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Learning Objectives Understand the logic of hypothesis testing, and know  how to establish null and alternate hypotheses Understand Type I and Type II errors, and know how  to solve for Type II errors Know how to implement the HTAB system to test  hypotheses Test hypotheses about a single population mean when  σ  is known Test hypotheses about a single population mean when  σ  is unknown
Image of page 2
Introduction to Statistical  Hypothesis Testing Hypothesis Testing A process of testing hypotheses about parameters by setting up null and  alternative hypotheses and using statistical techniques to reach  conclusions about the hypotheses Statistical Hypotheses a formal hypothesis structure consisting of the null hypothesis and the  alternative hypothesis, which together contain all possible outcomes of  the experiment or study Null Hypothesis The hypothesis that assumes the status quo – that the old theory,  method or standard is still true; the complement of the alternative  hypothesis  Alternative Hypothesis the hypothesis that complements the null hypothesis. Usually it is the  hypothesis that the researcher is interested in proving
Image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Null and Alternative  Hypotheses:  Example A manufacturer is filling 2 kg packages with flour They wish to determine if the packaging process  is out-of-control as determined by the weight of  the flour packages The null hypothesis indicates that there is no  problem with the packaging process, the  alternative hypothesis is that the process is out- of-control 0 a H : 2 kg H : 2 kg μ μ =
Image of page 4
Null and Alternative  Hypotheses:  Example A company has held 18% share of the market Because of an increased marketing effort they now  believe the company’s share is greater than 18% The null hypothesis indicates that the market share  is still 18% or has even dropped lower (converted to  a proportion), the alternative hypothesis is that the  market share is now greater than 18%. For  convenience, we can simply use = in the null  hypothesis 0 a H : 0.18 H : 0.18 p p =
Image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Null and Alternative  Hypotheses The Null and Alternative Hypotheses are  mutually exclusive.  Only one of them can be  true The Null and Alternative Hypotheses are  collectively exhaustive.  They are stated to  include all possibilities.  (An abbreviated form  of the null hypothesis is often used – see  previous slide) The Null Hypothesis is assumed to be true The burden of proof falls on the Alternative  Hypothesis
Image of page 6
Image of page 7
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern