19960026640_1996059105 - /i_'.-_"/ NASA...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: /i_'.-_"/ NASA Technical Memorandum 107224 Potential Starter/Generator Technologies for Future Aerospace Applications Malik E. Elbuluk University of Akron Akron, Ohio and M. David Kankam Lewis Research Center Cleveland, Ohio Prepared for the National Aerospace and Electronics Conference cosponsored by IEEE, WBAFB, and AESS Dayton, Ohio, May 20-24, 1996 National Aeronautics and Space Administration Potential Starter/Generator Technologies for Future Aerospace Applications Malik E. Elbuluk Department of Electrical Engine, eft ng University of Akron Akron, OH 44325-3904 Tel. (216) 972-6531 Fax. (216) 972-6487 email:melbuluk@uakron.edu M. David Kankam Power Technology Division, MS 301-5 NASA Lewis Research Center Cleveland, OH 44135 Tel. (216) 433-6143 Fax. (216) 433-8311 email: m.kankam@lerc.nasa.gov Abstract This paper presents a search and comparative review* of the literature available on variable speed constant frequency (VSCF) technologies. In particular, most of the progress made in the past ten years, using power electronics and electric machines for VSCF systems, is reported. Two VSCF systems, based on induction and switched reluctance machine technologies, are presented. The research on the singly- and doubly-fed induction machines has focused on VSCF for wind power generation, whereas that on switched reluctance machines has been directly studied as a VSCF technology in aircraft system. Results obtained so far favor the switched reluctance machine over the induction machine. Based on the foregoing comparative review, it is recommended that the induction machine be fully investigated as a VSCF drive for aircraft systems. The findings should then be compared with the counterpart SRM system. Issues of comparison may include fault tolerance and redundancy, power density, torque requirements, overload ratings, temperature range and cooling, efficiency and stability over expected operating speed range. 1. Introduction The advancement in power electronics and electric drives is expected to enhance the reliability, fault tolerance, power density and performance of the concept of the more electric aircraft (MEA). The starter/generator is a key technology in the MEA [1] for providing engine start and power to electric driven pumps and other electrical loads and actuators. Traditionally, electric power for aerospace applications has been generated over many years, using the wound-field synchronous machine to obtain constant frequency of 400 Hz. This machine/drive system is known as a constant speed drive (CSD) [2]. The quality of ac waveforrns and control of the machine have been improved considerably. However, the machine has been challenged by different requirements associated with various power types, increased reliability, ease of maintenance, cost, higher * This work was supported during 1995 summer Faculty Research Fellowship from The Power Technology Division at NASA Lewis Research Center....
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 08/22/2011 for the course EEE 230 taught by Professor Subramanian during the Spring '07 term at University of California, Berkeley.

Page1 / 14

19960026640_1996059105 - /i_'.-_"/ NASA...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online