Rich Pugh Final project

Rich Pugh Final project - Alternative Energy Sources 1...

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Alternative Energy Sources 1 Alternative Energy Sources Rich Pugh Kaplan University
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Alternative Energy Sources 2 Alternative Energy Sources Today’s energy sources are at risk of running out in the near future. The world’s rising energy needs will soon outgrow the reserves we have for oil and coal. The need to move onto greener sources of energy and reduce the impact on the environment before the damage done is irreversible. Many alternative sources of energy available to use and the technology is available to implement them into energy grids. Wind, solar, hydroelectric power and hydrogen fuel cells are the alternative sources of the future because of their availability and earth friendly impact on the environment; compared to coal, fossil fuels, and nuclear power. Implementation of these alternative sources is a daunting task that cannot be avoided. Despite the concerns of how to implement these alternative energy sources and their costs, the benefits on the environment by doing so now will long outweigh the costs. Today’s current global power consumption is about 12.5 terawatts and by 2030 it is projected to reach 16.9 trillion terawatts with current energy sources and by using alternative sources of energy that demand would be brought down to 11.5 terawatts by 2030 (Jacobson, Delucchi, 2009 p.3). One terawatt is equal to one trillion watts of power. To put this in to perspective, the world’s usage is projected to go up by 4,400,000,000,000 watts in power usage in only 20 years. The use of solar energy not only shows promise of reducing greenhouse gases but reduces the overall need for more power. This would be a significant savings in electrical power, meaning less power would need to be produced to meet global needs and increased savings would be passed along to the consumer. Thermal solar energy plants, however, are not useful close to the
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Alternative Energy Sources 3 shore of any country due to the high volume of cloud cover. In that case, opting for a water energy source is the alternative. Water energy sources are the “wave” of the future. Water energy trials are being done in the UK right now. There are several different types of water energy converters available to use today. One is called an Oyster Wave energy converter. This energy converter is used in our oceans to convert wave movement into energy. The water is pumped to an onshore generator where the energy is then generated. By using this type of converter, we can also generate fresh drinking water from the ocean by using reverse osmosis (Dettmer, 2008 p.29), another benefit of using water energy sources in locations that lack fresh water. Another type of wave converter is called the Searaser. “17 Searasers will produce more than 1MW, meaning that some 217,000 machines would generate enough electricity to meet the UK’s entire domestic electricity demand” (Dettmer, 2008 p.29). This may sound like a lot of machines to achieve a relatively small amount of electricity but for island countries, this is becoming an attractive source. Not
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This note was uploaded on 08/22/2011 for the course AUDITING AC410 taught by Professor Prof during the Spring '11 term at Kaplan University.

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Rich Pugh Final project - Alternative Energy Sources 1...

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