AAS 181 - The Rap on Rap

AAS 181 - The Rap on Rap - The Rap on Rap: The Black Music...

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The Rap on Rap: The “Black Music” that Isn’t Either By David Samuels Presented by Gabrielle Grow
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Purpose of this Essay To show the emergence of rap’s young, white, upper- middle class audience The more rappers were packaged as violent black criminals, the bigger their white audiences became The racial makeup of rap’s audience has been largely misunderstood
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Vocabulary Ghettocentrism: a style-driven cult of blackness defined by crude stereotypes (pg. 152) Authenticity: being genuine, keeping it real, etc Complicity: partnership or involvement in a wrongdoing Appropriation: adopting beliefs or actions and making them one’s own Voyeurism: obsessive observation from a protected view (ie, white teens getting view of “ghetto” from rap music)
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Overview Samuels’ 1991 article argues that the ways in which rap has been consumed (by both black and white audiences alike) are not signals of cross-cultural understanding, but signals a tolerance of racism in which both blacks and whites are complicit
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This note was uploaded on 08/23/2011 for the course AAS 181 taught by Professor Osumare during the Spring '09 term at UC Davis.

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AAS 181 - The Rap on Rap - The Rap on Rap: The Black Music...

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