Discar8 - This brain pattern activity, while distinct,...

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Tim Discar February 15, 2011 UWP 101 Haynes Journal Entry #8 In the reading excerpt, “Duped,” by Margaret Talbot, the author describes the different components of a lie. There are multiple ways of spotting a liar as described in the article. Liars typically tell their stories pretty chronologically with less hesitation. This evidence I believe was strong evidence that I only realized was true after I read this article. Through recollection and storytelling, an individual can remember the story out of order, thus not making any chronological sense. But that’s how our brains work. The detail that the author provides through anecdotes emphasized the actual evidence she provided. She also provides evidence with strong reasoning with the use of MRI’s to depict the brain activity of a liar and compare that to someone who actually is telling the truth. While the scientific information is sound, the experimental error involved makes it harder to justify as conclusive evidence. An individual is told to lie down in the machine and forced to fabricate lies.
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Unformatted text preview: This brain pattern activity, while distinct, cannot be fully applied to individuals who naturally lie or are not forced to lie. Another fault in the evidence is the fact that the machine used sometimes works, but sometimes doesnt. With the evidence provided, I feel that the author takes one step forward with solid evidence and two steps back discrediting the evidence she just provided. This same concept can be applied to the topographies used to determine if an individual is lying based on their heart rate, sweat on their palms, blood pressure, etc. While many individuals can actually be caught lying using this machine, the author starts to discredit the machine by individuals who start to manipulate their results by means of biting their tongue which increases their heart rate basically making their actual true statements look like lies. Through the quality of evidence provided, I believe that the author discredits more than assert the information she provides....
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This note was uploaded on 08/23/2011 for the course AAS 181 taught by Professor Osumare during the Spring '09 term at UC Davis.

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