Lecture9_BatteryStorageTechnologies

Lecture9_BatteryStorageTechnologies - Lecture Lecture 9...

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ecture 9 Lecture 9 Battery Storage Devices See online Text, PVCDROM for more detailed discussion ECE 4833 - Dr. Alan Doolittle Georgia Tech
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What is a Chemical Battery A Chemical Battery is simply a device that allows energy to be stored in a chemical form and to be released when needed . Primary batteries only store energy and cannot be recharged. Most PV useful batteries also require that the energy can be “re-charged” by forcing the discharge reaction to be reversed and thus use rechargeable “secondary” batteries. ECE 4833 - Dr. Alan Doolittle Georgia Tech
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What is a Chemical Battery A Chemical Battery consists of at least three regions: Cathode: Negative potential lead Anode: Positive potential lead Electrolyte: A “weak barrier” that allows ions to be transferred from anode to cathode. Some batteries may have more than one electrolyte and/or the electrolyte may be solid, liquid or even gaseous or a mix of any phase. A battery requires mass transport to occur – which takes time limiting the overall out put. ECE 4833 - Dr. Alan Doolittle Georgia Tech
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Battery Chemistry “101” (ECE Simplified) A Chemical Battery uses two primary reactions to reversibly store and discharge energy. These reactions are separated in space allowing a load to be connected between the points of the reaction (anode and cathode): Oxidation: The valence state of the reactant increases. For example: Where 2 electrons are released raising the valence of zinc from neutral (0) to doubly charged (2+) when in a solution (aqueous = aq).   e aq Zn Zn 2 2 0 Reducing: The valence state of the reactant decreases. For example: 0 2 u q u Together this set of reactions is often referred to as “Redox” reactions. An oxidation reaction must be paired with a reduction reaction, as the oxidation reaction produces the electrons required by the   2 Cu e aq Cu reduction reaction. Thus, the combined reaction of electrons leaving Zn and ending up on Cu is:    e aq Zn Cu e Zn aq Cu Solid Solid 2 2 2 0 0 2 ECE 4833 - Dr. Alan Doolittle Georgia Tech
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Battery Chemistry “101” (ECE Simplified) Electrochemical Potential: The electrochemical potential is a measure of the potential energy difference between the average energy of the outer most electrons of the molecule (or element) in its two valence states.
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This note was uploaded on 08/23/2011 for the course ECE 4833 taught by Professor Doolittle during the Spring '10 term at Georgia Institute of Technology.

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Lecture9_BatteryStorageTechnologies - Lecture Lecture 9...

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