Lecture Electroreception

Lecture Electroreception - Electroreception involves use of...

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Electroreception involves use of hair cells • receptors in fishes extremely sensitive to small voltage gradients • lower limit of detection: 5 nV/cm • sources of voltage fields in nature? – animals! (Kalmijn’s research) – “bioelectric signals” – inanimate fields (electrochemical, geologic, atmospheric processes)
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Electroreception • electroreceptors found in fishes, amphibians, lampreys, platypus • 2 modes of receptor function: – Passive; animal detects fields from external sources (e.g., sharks, rays, eels, catfish) – Active; animal detects fields caused by its own signal activity • New World knife fishes (Gymnotidae) • Old World elephant nose fishes (Mormyridae)
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Electroreceptors • Specialized secondary cells, derived from lateral line receptors • Located in pits or canals, and each is innervated by a single neuron • Widely distributed over body surface • 2 physiological types: – tonic receptors (ampullary organs) • steady resting discharge, increases or decreases on stimulation • monitors low frequency or DC stimuli (0.1 to 10 Hz
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Lecture Electroreception - Electroreception involves use of...

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