LesleyChubick_SS230-01_Unit9_FinalProject_AmericanHistory

LesleyChubick_SS230-01_Unit9_FinalProject_AmericanHistory -...

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Lesley Chubick SS230-01 Making History: The Founding Fathers Unit 9 Final Project “Robert Fulton”
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One of the most obscure and famous men in American history was Robert Fulton. Robert Fulton was born near Lancaster, Pennsylvania, in 1765 on a little farm where he spent most of his boyhood years. Even at an early age Fulton showed inventive talents such as turning out lead pencils and household utensils for his mother. He always fancied himself an artist and specialized in miniature portraits and landscape sense. His most famous subject was probably Benjamin Franklin. Truth be known Fulton was more than a painter; he was an inventor, publisher, mechanical and civil engineer. Robert Fulton invented machines for spinning flax, making rope and even a machine for sawing marble without breaking it. In 1795 Fulton published a document called the Treatise on Canal Navigation. He described a number of very ingenious devices in improvement of the then common methods and apparatus of locks and other accessories of the canal. In making the illustrations, he illustrated as well his own skill in drawing, and his own power of designing details of his machinery. Copies of his work were sent to the governor of Pennsylvania and to General Washington, whose reply expressed an interest in the subject, and confidence in the final adoption of some systems of general intercommunication in the United States. 1797 Fulton moved to France and began designing submarines for the French Navy. Fulton’s submarine, the Nautilus, remained submerged and operational in twenty- five feed deep water for seventeen minutes. While working on the Nautilus Fulton invented the torpedo. The Fulton torpedo laid the groundwork for torpedoes that are still used today and is an important weapon in today’s warfare. It is thought that he believed that if warfare was made sufficiently destructive and horrible it will be abandoned, a way
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of thinking often invoked by inventories of military devices. While the French military
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This note was uploaded on 07/25/2011 for the course ACCOUNTING 116 taught by Professor Angeladuck during the Spring '11 term at Kaplan University.

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LesleyChubick_SS230-01_Unit9_FinalProject_AmericanHistory -...

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