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Personality - Personality Individual differences such as...

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Personality Individual differences such as honesty or anxiousness or moodiness are psychological meaningful and specific
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Personality Describing and Explaining Personality What people are like Why people are the way they are Measuring personality Personality inventories Projective techniques
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Personality Inventories Self-report A series of answers to a questionaire that asks people to indicate the extent to which sets of statements or adjectives accurately describe their own behavior or mental state
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Personality Inventories Sensation-Seeking Scale True or False: I enjoy getting into new situations where you an’t predict how things will turn out. I’ll try anything once. I sometimes do “crazy” things just for fun. I like to explore a strange city or section of town by myself, even if it means getting lost.
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Personality Inventories Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI) A well-researched, clinical questionaire used to assess personality and psychological problems
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Personality Inventories Consists of more than 500 descriptive statements (answer TRUE or FALSE or CANNOT SAY ) “I think the world is a dangerous place” “I’m good at socializing” Ten subscales Measure different personality characteristics Assess tendencies toward clinical problems
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Projective Techniques A standard series of ambiguous stimuli designed to elicit unique responses that reveal inner aspects of an individual’s personality. Rorschach Inkblot Thematic Apperception Test (TAT)
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Assessing the Unconscious -- Rorschach Rorschach Inkblot Test the most widely used projective test a set of 10 inkblots designed by Hermann Rorschach Rorschach
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Assessing the Unconscious-- Rorschach used to identify people’s inner feelings by analyzing their interpretations of the blots
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Rorschach inkblot Individual interpretations of the meaning of a set of these unstructured inkblots are analyzed to identify a respondent’s inner feelings and interpret his or her personality structure
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Rorschach inkblot Critics argue that although the Rorschach captures some of the more complex and private aspects of personality, the test is open to the subjective interpretation and theoretic biases of the examiner Evidence is sparse that Rorschach test scores have predictive value
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Assessing the Unconscious--TAT Thematic Apperception Test (TAT) people express their inner motives through the stories they make up about ambiguous scenes
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TAT: 1930’s Henry Murray Respondents reveal underlying motives, concerns, and the way they see the social world through the stories they make up about ambiguous pictures of people.
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