Evidence and the importance to the investigative process

Evidence and the importance to the investigative process -...

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Click to edit Master subtitle style Unit 3 ~~Creative
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Click to edit Master subtitle style Question Identify the types of evidence  and their importance to the  investigative process .
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Types of Physical DNA Documents Trace Evidence (fibers, hair, soil, paint chips, etc.) Latent Prints Bodily Fluids (saliva, semen, blood) Firearms (bullets, casings, etc.) Impressions (tires, foot, bite, etc.) Tool marks Computers, PDA, cell phones, etc.
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Physical Evidence As stated in the book, here are definitions for the types of Physical Evidence I will be discussing in this project: Blood  – a common clue material in many of the more serious crimes against the  person: homicide, felonious assault, robbery and rape.  Trace Evidence  – physical evidence so small that to be examined requires a  stereomicroscope or polarized light microscope or both.   Examples: (hair, fibers, plastics, paint chips, glass, headlight filaments, soil, etc.) DNA  – a naturally occurring substance, and the principal component of cellular  chromosomes, DNA is responsible for the hereditary (genetic) characteristics in all life  forms.  It is composed of four nitrogenous bases known as adenine, guanine, cytosine,  and thymine or A, G, C, and T. Tool marks –  nicks, dents, broken edges, and other damage from misuse or abuse; striations are 
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How is it Collected? Blood (liquid) Picked up on a gauze pad.  Clean sterile cotton cloth. Allowed to air dry thoroughly, at room temperature.  Should be refrigerated or frozen as soon as possible and brought to the Lab as quickly as possible. Delays beyond 48  hours may make the samples useless. Blood (Dried) On clothing, if possible, wrap the item in clean paper, place the article in a brown paper bag or box and seal and label  container. Do not attempt to remove stains from the cloth.  On small solid objects, send the whole stained object to the Laboratory, after labeling and packaging. On large solid objects, cover the stained area with clean paper and seal the edges down with tape to prevent loss or 
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This note was uploaded on 08/24/2011 for the course CJ 210 taught by Professor Cain during the Spring '11 term at Kaplan University.

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Evidence and the importance to the investigative process -...

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