Most+Significant+Events+Kelly+Schwebel do not copy

Most+Significant+Events+Kelly+Schwebel do not copy -...

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Running head: MOST SIGNIFICANT EVENTS 1 Most Significant Events Kelly Schwebel HIS 135 July 24, 2011 Cynthia Krutsinger
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Most Significant Events Introduction Early on in its national history, America was known for its achievements in agriculture and exploration. At this time, Europe was still considered the Cultural Mecca. Americans at this time looked to Europe for their education, manners, and for their overall cultural guidance. Eventually, though, as immigrants from every corner of the world joined American society, these new Americans began moving away from European culture and media. Americans began to create new ideas and work that sprung from American popular culture. The American Constitution (2008) had given American citizens the right to freedom of expression and speech, which meant that Americans were inherently unrestricted in their artistic works and their other cultural creations. Popular culture has been called “mass” or “common” culture, but it is worth calling popular culture a “commercial” culture. Since America traditionally absorbs the cultures that its immigrants bring, sometimes an entirely new culture results. For example, American Chinese food is quite distinct from traditional Chinese food, though it was originally inspired by it. Particular aspects of other cultures are sometimes absorbed, like the American appropriation of yoga, origami, and anime media. Examining the past five decades of American culture reveals an astonishing picture – Americas have not only been expressing themselves through every available media, but they have also dominated global culture and entertainment during this period. 1950 – U.S. Television
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Today we would be unlikely to even recognize the television that existed before the 1950s. The 1950s brought about cultural and economic changes that would be seen for the next twenty years. As the Great Depression ended, violence decreased, and affluent families began moving from the cities to the suburbs. The consumer revolution was beginning, and in most households the husband was the family's primary breadwinner. Milk was delivered to the doorstep of every house, and the average family had an income of $3,300 per year (Television/TV the history of changes over 70 years, 2009). A major difference in early television was that, prior to 1950; broadcasts could only be viewed in the city that broadcasted the signal. The television display picture tended to be unrecognizable lines, silhouettes, or shadows – this, unsurprisingly, did not offer much entertainment value. In the late 1940s the picture quality improved, and people began to watch larger television screens. When WWII began, though, most local broadcasting was limited or completely stopped until the end of the war. After the end of the WWII, both television manufacturing and broadcasting started up
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