flightoringins - The origin of flight .and of birds Two...

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The origin of flight . ..and of birds Two possibilities 1. Cursorial (“Ground-up”) 2. Arboreal (“Trees-down”) Whichever you embrace, it’s critical to remember that any anatomical changes must have taken place gradually. In other words, wings and feathers don’t just appear.
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The Cursorial Theory Bipedal reptiles = fast runners But, how to leap into the air and start flying?! Ostrom’s “insect net” hypothesis comes to the rescue. ... Or does it? Not parsimonious Problems with lift Power alone does no good; you need control, too.
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A newer version of the cursorial theory (Caple, Balda & Willis) Emphasis on gradual steps that match power with sophisticated neuromuscular control 1. Fast, bipedal insectivore that caught flying insects in its mouth. 2. Leaps. Small amounts of lift added to distal parts of forelimb (control, maneuverability) 3. Motions used are similar to those used in flight 4. Larger surfaces generate more lift and more control. Positive feedback: Lift Control
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Arboreal Theory
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flightoringins - The origin of flight .and of birds Two...

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