Soaring and gliding

Soaring and gliding - Soaring and gliding Soaring =...

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Soaring and gliding Large birds have low power margin. It’s not surprising they soar. Why don’t small birds soar…? Soaring = maintaining or increasing altitude while not flapping Gliding = losing altitude while not flapping
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What happens when a bird stops flapping? Lift Thrust Weight Drag
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What happens when a bird stops flapping? Lift (reduced) Weight (no change) Drag (reduced) Velocity decreases, so lift and drag decrease Because weight doesn’t change, Weight > Lift. So, the bird will start to fall It will tilt forward, which adds lift and drag vectors and sets their sum against weight
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Lift-to-drag ratio determines how well a bird can soar Lift Drag Net force weight Angle of descent is small High Lift:Drag ratio Lift Net force weight Angle of descent is large Low Lift:Drag ratio Drag
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There are two main types of drag 1. Profile drag = force needed to push air aside. Mostly generated by bird’s body (not wings). Pretty much independent of lift. 2.
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Soaring and gliding - Soaring and gliding Soaring =...

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