gaf-cec-journal - Topology Control Protocols to Conserve...

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Topology Control Protocols to Conserve Energy in Wireless Ad Hoc Networks Ya Xu USC/Information Sciences Institute 4676 Admiralty Way Marina Del Rey, CA 90292-6695 [email protected] Solomon Bien Dept. of Computer Science, UCLA Los Angeles, CA 90095 [email protected] Yutaka Mori Dept. of Computer Science, USC Los Angeles, CA 90089 [email protected] John Heidemann USC/Information Sciences Institute 4676 Admiralty Way Marina Del Rey, CA 90292-6695 [email protected] Deborah Estrin Dept. of Computer Science, UCLA Los Angeles, CA 90095 [email protected] January 23, 2003 Abstract In wireless ad hoc networks and sensor networks, energy use is in many cases the most important constraint since it corresponds directly to opera- tional lifetime. This paper presents two topology control protocols that extend the lifetime of dense ad hoc networks while preserving connectivity , the ability for nodes to reach each other. Our protocols conserve energy by identifying redundant nodes and turning their radios off. Geographic Adaptive Fidelity (GAF) identifies redundant nodes by their physical location and a conservative estimate of radio range. Cluster-based Energy Conservation (CEC) directly observes radio connectivity to determine redundancy and so can be more aggres- sive at identifying duplication and more robust to radio fading. We evaluate these protocols through Center for Embedded Networked Sensing (CENS) Tech- nical Report #6 This material is based upon work supported by the Na- tional Science Foundation (NSF) under Cooperative Agree- ment #CCR-0121778 analysis, extensive simulations, and experimental results in two wireless testbeds, showing that the protocols are robust to variance in node mobility, radio propagation, node deployment density, and other factors. Index terms: Wireless sensor networks, Adaptive topology, Topology control, Energy conservation 1 Introduction Multihop, wireless, ad hoc networking has been the focus of many recent research and development efforts for its applications in military, commer- cial, and educational environments such as wireless LAN connections in the office, networks of appli- ances at home, and sensor networks. A number of routing protocols have been pro- posed to provide multi-hop communication in wire- less, ad hoc networks [21, 5, 22, 20]. Tradition- ally these protocols are evaluated in terms of packet loss rates, routing message overhead, and route 1
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ad hoc routing protocol energy consumed (J) AODV DSR DSDV TORA 0 10 20 30 w/out idle energy consumption with idle energy consumption Figure 1: Comparison of energy consumed for four ad hoc routing protocols with different energy mod- els (left, black bars are without considering energy consumed when listening; right, gray bars include this consumption). The simulation has 50 nodes in a 1500m*300m area. Nodes move according to the random way-point model. The energy model is based on Stemm and Katz [31]. length [6, 18, 11].
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gaf-cec-journal - Topology Control Protocols to Conserve...

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