Lecture7 feb18 topology

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Unformatted text preview: Topology Management in Ad hoc and Sensor Networks The need for Topology Management Energy/Power consumption Interference Throughput Connectivity Mobility-Adaptive Protocols for Managing Large Ad hoc Networks [Basagni+ 2001] Motivation for Backbone Architecture essential for management of large ad hoc networks helps generate the minimum possible overhead for construction and maintenance of the backbone network can provide efficient solution for mobility and node/link failures in very large ad hoc networks Mobility-Adaptive Protocols for Managing Large Ad hoc Networks Proposed B-Protocol Description B-Protocol Also known as backbone protocols Sets up and maintains a connected network (B-network) B-network convey the time-sensitive network management information from every node in the network with minor overhead and in a timely manner Comprises two major tasks: (a) B-nodes selection (b) B-links establishment Nodes that are not selected as B-nodes are termed F- nodes that belong to the flat network Mobility-Adaptive Protocols for Managing Large Ad hoc Networks B-nodes Selection Executed at each node based on a node's own weight Weight is computed based on what is most critical to that node for the specific network application The highest weight of a node is more suitable to be a B-node A node knows Its own identifier (ID) and weight Ids, weights and roles (B-node or F-node) of one-hop neighbors Once a node b determines its role as B-node, all its neighbors may become the F-nodes served under b unless they have decided to join another node B-nodes selection is adaptive to node mobility and changes in its local status Mobility-Adaptive Protocols for Managing Large Ad hoc Networks B-nodes Selection Illustrative Example: 6(1) 4(9) 1(6) 2(3) 7(5) 5(8) 3(2) 8(1) Numbers represent node IDs and numbers within parentheses represent the node weights Mobility-Adaptive Protocols for Managing Large Ad hoc Networks B-nodes Selection Illustrative Example: 6(1) 4(9) B-node 1(6) 2(3) 7(5) B-node 5(8) B-node 3(2) 8(1) Mobility-Adaptive Protocols for Managing Large Ad hoc Networks B-links Establishment Determines the inter-B-nodes links to be established in order for the network to be connected Two types of B-links: Physical when a direct link between B-nodes at most three hops away can be established without involving intermediate F-nodes (via power control or directional antenna) Virtual when a direct link between B-nodes at most three hops away cannot be established. In this case, virtual link is implemented among two B-nodes by a corresponding physical path with at most three links The rules stated follow the theorem proven in [Chlamtac '96] Mobility-Adaptive Protocols for Managing Large Ad hoc Networks B-links Establishment Theorem 1 [Chlamtac '96]: Given a set B of network nodes such that no two of them are neighbors and every other node has a link to a node in B, then a connected backbone is guaranteed to arise if each node in B establishes links to all other nodes in B that are at most three hops away. Moreover, these links are all needed for the d...
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This note was uploaded on 08/25/2011 for the course EEL 5937 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '08 term at University of Central Florida.

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