01_Earth_Sun_Energy_Balance_F10

01_Earth_Sun_Energy_Balance_F10 - Angle of Insolation...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–20. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Click to edit Master subtitle style Earth-Sun  Module 1
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Figure 1.20, p.  52
Background image of page 2
Figure 1.22, p.  53 circle of  illumination touches both  poles subsolar point  at  equator  12 hours of  hours of  darkness  Equinoxes: March & September
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
June 22:  subsolar point at 23.5°N (Tropic of Cancer) Dec. 22:  subsolar point at 23.5°S (Tropic of Capricorn) Solstices: June & December
Background image of page 4
Seven Significant Latitudes
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Figure 1.24, p.  54
Background image of page 6
Figure 1.21, p.  52 Solstices & Equinoxes
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Figure 2.3, p. 60 Electromagnetic  Radiation
Background image of page 8
Electromagnetic  Radiation   - HOT sun emits  shortwave  (ultraviolet, visible,   shortwave infrared) -  COOL Earth emits  longwave (infrared)  -  much longwave is  absorbed by Earth’s  Figure 2.5, p. 62
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Figure 2.6, p.637 Global Insolation  insolation (in coming sol ar radiation ) varies by latitude & season
Background image of page 10
Background image of page 11

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 12
Background image of page 13

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 14
Background image of page 15

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 16
Background image of page 17

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 18
Background image of page 19

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 20
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: Angle of Insolation Figure 2.7, p. 64 Seasonal Insolation: Equator Figure 2.9, p. 66 Seasonal Insolation: 40 North Figure 2.8, p. 65 IG4e_02_09 Seasonal Insolation: North Pole Figure 2.9, p. 66 IG4e_02_08 Figure 2.10, p. 67 Seasonal Insolation Figure 2.12, p. 68 Latitude Zones- under clear skies, 80% of insolation may reach the ground- under cloudy skies, only 10-45% may reach the ground Figure 2.14, p.70 Insolation Figure 2.18, p. 75 Albedo Albedo - % solar radiation reflected fresh snow = 85-95% dry sand = 35-40% tropical forest = ~13% Net radiation = difference between incoming & outgoing radiation Deficit at high latitudes heat transfer moves surplus energy from low to high latitudes Figure 2.19, p.75 Global...
View Full Document

Page1 / 20

01_Earth_Sun_Energy_Balance_F10 - Angle of Insolation...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 20. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online