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Week12-1 - WEEK 12 MUSIC AND MODERNISM CROSSING THE...

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WEEK 12: MUSIC AND MODERNISM: CROSSING THE ATLANTIC Lecture 30: Monday, November 8 Cultivated and/or Vernacular: Musical Nationalism in the United States Now listening: Copland, Billy the Kid. Scene I “Street in a Frontier Town”
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WEEK 12: MUSIC AND MODERNISM: CROSSING THE ATLANTIC Lecture 30: Monday, November 8 Cultivated and/or Vernacular: Musical Nationalism in the United States Now listening: Copland, Billy the Kid Scene I “Street in a Frontier Town”
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Review Q. 1 __________’s treatment of opera as human drama (in contrast to the German’s emphasis on romanticized nature and mythological symbolism) revealed a deeply ingrained national trait. A. Rossini B. Donizetti C. Verdi D. Puccini
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Review Q. 2 If ______ believed with all his heart that each nation should cultivate its own native music, ______ believed that operas should tell the stories of the Italian people. A. Verdi//Puccini B. Puccini//Verdi C. Bizet//Wagner D. Wagner//Bizet
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Review Q. 3 Who did master melody and orchestral color to portray tragedy, comedy, and desperate impossible love? A. Mozart B. Rossini C. Verdi D. Puccini
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Review Q. 4 Verismo means: A. Verdi’s opera style B. Realism C. Exoticism D. Nationalism
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Review Q. 5 The plot of _______ is about oppressed people resisting foreign tyranny (imperialism) A.Nabucco B.Gianni Schicchi C.Carmen D.Siegfried
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We have seen how music travels along with people… Lecture 1, 08/25 (What kind of music is that?) creating new musical imaginaries
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http://www.gracegalleries.com/Atlantic_Ocean_Listings.htm c. 1880 Western Colonialism/Imperialism
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Cultivated vs. Vernacular Cultivated music is music that has been consciously developed as “art” and carefully taught (for example, at conservatories) Vernacular music is music that we think of as “natural”, that develops “spontaneously” out of our culture’s expression This distinction has to do with how we think of our music and our culture, rather than with any inherent qualities in the music’s sound Nonetheless, it is a useful distinction, especially for the history of musical style (and social place of music) in the United States European immigrants bring what they consider “cultivated” music to North America; by 1800s, established tradition is German (symphonic) and Italian (operatic) Immigrants also establish a separate musical tradition, which gradually becomes associated with “American vernacular music” Two basic categories in the American “vernacular” tradition: sacred music (hymns) and secular music (songs, dances, marches)
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How people from both sides of the Atlantic imagined themselves and the Others through music?
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