Week9-3 - Now playing: Paganini, Caprice, Op. 1 no. 5 (as...

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Now playing: Paganini, Caprice, Op. 1 no. 5 (as played by Alexander Markov)
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Week 9: Music, Amateurs, and the Bourgeoisie Public Music: Amateur and Virtuoso Lecture 23: Friday, October 22 Now Playing: Franz Liszt, Réminiscences des Huguenots
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Work in pairs and defne: Amateur Virtuoso What do these words mean to you? Can an amateur be a virtuoso? Name two virtuosos that you know Name two amateurs that you know
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Virtuoso (It.) (1) As noun: a performer of exceptional skill with particular reference to technical ability. (2) As adjective: a performance of exceptional technical accomplishment. There is sometimes an implication that a virtuoso performance excludes emotional and expressive artistry, or subdues it to technical display, but a true virtuoso is both technician and artist. "Virtuoso." In The Oxford Dictionary of Music , 2nd ed. rev., edited by Michael Kennedy. Oxford Music Online , http://www.oxfordmusiconline.com.ezproxy.lib.utexas.edu/subscriber/article/opr/t237/e10752 (accessed October 22, 2010).
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Virtuoso (It., ‘exceptional performer’) The term originally referred to several types of musician: performers, composers, and even theorists. By the later 18th century, however, it was generally used to dignify a singer or instrumentalist of great talent (‘virtuosa’ if the person was female). The term became more problematic in the 19th century and later, sometimes being used to describe a performer whose talent was ‘merely’ technical, unduly crowd- pleasing, and lacking in good taste; but the positive meaning of the term is still in more general use, its most common association being with such celebrated 19th-century soloists as Paganini and Liszt . Parker, Roger. "virtuoso." In The Oxford Companion to Music , edited by Alison Latham. Oxford Music Online , http://www.oxfordmusiconline.com.ezproxy.lib.utexas.edu/subscriber/article/opr/t114/e7172 (accessed October 22, 2010).
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Virtuoso (It., from Lat. virtus : ‘excellence’, ‘worth’) A person of notable accomplishment; a musician of extraordinary technical skill. In its original Italian usage (particularly in the 16th and 17th centuries) ‘virtuoso’ was a term of honour reserved for a person distinguished in any intellectual or artistic Feld: a poet, architect, scholar etc. A virtuoso in music might be a skilful performer, but more importantly he was a composer, a theorist or at least a famous maestro di cappella . In the late 17th and 18th centuries a great number of Italian musicians carried the term ‘virtuoso’ to the courts and theatres of northern Europe, regularly applying it to themselves whether or not they merited such distinction in the traditional Italian sense. Brossard ( Dictionaire , 1703), writing in ±rance at a time when debate raged over Italian music and musicians, approached the word ‘virtuoso’ by way of its Latin root ‘virtu’, emphasizing that the true virtuoso was a musician of exceptional training, especially in theory (the same emphasis is found in Walther’s
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Week9-3 - Now playing: Paganini, Caprice, Op. 1 no. 5 (as...

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