wang-atdm - Cooperating Robots for Search and Rescue Jijun...

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Cooperating Robots for Search and Rescue Jijun Wang School of Information Sciences University of Pittsburgh 136 N. Bellefield Ave. Pittsburgh, PA 15260 412-624-9426 Jiw1+@pitt.edu Michael Lewis School of Information Sciences University of Pittsburgh 136 N. Bellefield Ave. Pittsburgh, PA 15260 412-624-9426 ml@sis.pitt.edu Paul Scerri Robotics Institute Carnegie Mellon University 5000 Forbes Ave. Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (412) 268-2145 pscerri@cs.cmu.edu ABSTRACT Many hypothesized applications of mobile robotics require multiple robots. Multiple robots substantially increase the complexity of the operator’s task because attention must be continually shifted among robots. One approach to increasing human capacity for control is to remove the independence among robots by allowing them to cooperate. This paper presents an initial experiment using multiagent teamwork proxies to help control robots performing a search and rescue task. . Categories and Subject Descriptors D J.7 : Computers in Other Systems General Terms Multiagent Systems, Experimentation, Human Factors Keywords Multiagent Systems, Multirobot Systems, Human-Robot Interaction. 1. INTRODUCTION Many hypothesized applications of mobile robotics require multiple robots. Envisioned applications such as interplanetary construction [4] or cooperating uninhabited aerial vehicles [8] will require close coordination and control between human operator(s) and cooperating teams of robots in uncertain environments. Multiple robots substantially increase the complexity of the operator’s task because she must continually shift attention among robots under her control, maintain situation awareness for both the team and individual robots, and exert control over a complex system. In the simplest case an operator controls multiple independent robots interacting with each as needed. Control performance at this task has been investigated both in terms of average demand on human attention [1] and for simultaneous demands from multiple robots that lead to bottlenecks [5]. In these approaches increasing robot autonomy allows robots to be neglected for longer periods of time making it possible for a single operator to control more robots. Providing additional autonomy by enabling robots to cooperate among themselves extends automation to human control activities previously needed to coordinate the robots’ actions. Automating this function should decrease the demands on the human operator to the extent that attention being devoted to a robot involved coordination with other robots. If substantial efforts were required for coordination automation should allow improvements in performance or control of larger teams. 1.1 Teamwork Algorithm The teamwork algorithms used to coordinate the simulated robots are general algorithms that have been shown to be effective in a range of domains [10]. To take advantage of this generality, the emerging standard approach is to encapsulate the algorithms in a reusable software proxy . Each team member has a proxy with
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This note was uploaded on 08/25/2011 for the course EGN 3060c taught by Professor Sukthankar,g during the Fall '08 term at University of Central Florida.

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wang-atdm - Cooperating Robots for Search and Rescue Jijun...

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