13 - Just My (B ad) Style Gerald Williams was a manager for...

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Unformatted text preview: Just My (B ad) Style Gerald Williams was a manager for an electrical engineering company. The company was growing rather quickly. Only a couple years out of college, Gerald was named the project manager in charge of a new microelectronics design team. The first thing he did was hire some new members for his team. He was fortunate to find some of the best and brightest electrical engineers available in his area. He had one problem, though. One of the employees he hired, DarrenYander, was an intense guy who did not handle criticism well. He was one of those people who believed he did everything right. Unfortunately, he also was a mediocre writer. His documents were hard to under— stand, and they were loaded with grammatical errors and typos. Gerald spoke with Darren about his writing skills on a couple occasions. He told Darren that he needed to spend more time revising and editing his drafts. Darren would usually dismiss Gerald’s concerns by saying he had a unique “style” that worked well for him: “All you want is for me to write like you. Well, I have a style of my own. I don’t think my creativity should be smothered with some boring bureau— cratic style.” Gerald decided that arguing with Darren about revising and editing his documents wasn’t worth it. Almost all of Darren’s documents were used ex— clusively within their team, so Darren’s writing style didn’t seem to matter. Unfortunately, one of Darren’s documents did go beyond the design team. One of his reports found its way into the hands of Margie Washington, one of the vice presidents of the company. Margie came to Gerald’s office and asked him about an “odd” report that was writ- ten by someone in his group. Gerald immediately recognized that the report was written by Darren in his “style.” The report was difficult to read and was very convoluted. It was also lit— tered with grammatical errors and typos. Gerald explained to Margie that he and Darren were working on improving his writ— ing skills. Margie said, “You better do something about this problem—quick. I don’t care if the guy is bright and hardworking. If another report like this one is sent to upper management, they’re going to start looking for someone to fire. You’re his boss. Do something.” After Margie left, Gerald called Darren to his office and explained the problem with the report. Darren grew very defensive.“lt’s not my fault upper management is too stupid to know good writing when they see it.” He refused to make revisions to the report. He also refused to work on improving his writing skills. If you were Gerald, what would you do in this situation? How would you handle it in a way that would allow all sides to be satisfied? Working in the Wired Workplace CHAPTER Using E—Mail and Instant Messaging The importance of e-mail and instant messaging in the workplace. 0 About e mail as a workplace communication tool and how it 18 used 0 _ in work settings. 0 The basic features and functions of e—mail. 0 Strategies for managing large amounts of e—mail in the workplace. 0 The use of netiquette to avoid problems with e-mail. 0 How to use instant messaging and understand its basic functions. If you are like most people, e—mail is already an important part of your life, and in- stant messaging (1M) is becoming more and more important. E-mail and instant messaging are now ' ' ' 015 in technical workplaces. E-mail is used in situations that once called for memos, letters, or a phone call. Meanwhile, in- stant messaging gives us the ability to chat with others in “real time” through a vari~ ety of technologies, including computers, wireless phones, and personal digital assistants (PDA). The use of e-mail and in stant messaging is Vital in today’s technical workplace. A 2004 survey by the Americ an Management Association (AMA) revealed that 47 per- 7 using e-mail at work. The t instant messaging is quickly becoming much more popular, soon to rival e—mail. More than likely, you already know how stant messaging (Figure 13.1). So, we won’t spend too much time on the basics in this chapter. Instead, you will learn how to use these communication tools more effec- tively and more efficiently in the technical workplace. to use e-mail and are familiar with in- E-Mail Basics Fest You.” Emit/Hail Readiness Figure Are you _ Yes No score e-mail ready? Here is - Can you receive and send messages? D D Yes Marks 3 quick test to see if - Can you forward documents to others? CI CI Expert 8—10 you’re up to speed. - Can you receive and send attached documents? Ci El Achiever 7—8 - Do you sort your email messages into folders? CI Ci Beginner 5—6 - Can you send one e—mail message to multiple people? Ci Cl Get to Work 0—5 - Have you created and used a signature tile? 3 Cl - Are you on any mailing liss (listservs)? Ci Cl - Do you know what flaming is? E] El - Do you know what spam is? El Cl - Do you know what netiquette is? CI 0 To learn about the history of e-mail, go to www.ablongman.com/johnsonweb2/13.1 workplace7 Can email be used to convey crucral information or confidential details. ‘ \Vhen is e-mail better than face—to—face communicatlon? \Vhen IS 1tw015e. b .d t h— f To answer these questions, you first need to recogmze that e-mgul 113:1L hyItrZanege ‘ er. I i ' ' features of a phone, a memo, an a e ‘ ‘ nology—it combines some of the ‘ . or letter ' ' ' hort message. 01,111“) a memo , ‘ sed like a hone (or v01ce mail) to leave a s . ‘ ‘ i ii can be usEd to send more significant information, like drafts of a document, new ' i olieies, or rogress reports. I a . i if p Differentp expectations for e—mail usage can lead to miiinudzisjangirégsfiieecxagrsgple ‘ ' ' 7 — o e u . , f 1 often have very different ideas about ho“ e mai 3 ' T ( i 1 f ‘ SSEZESWTI in Figure 13.2, a formal request for information might be 0\ erlooked by 3 ~ ‘ uses are still being defined. Should it completely replace memos and letters in the i 1 someone who believes e-mail is only for informal purposes. or worse, it might 1recege ‘ i i a casual or flippant response that would seem very unprofessronal. (Susan, 1n lgu l 3 13.2, probably has a big problem.) Different Expectations for E—Maill Usage To: SusanT@brunkhill.com cc: TheBoss@ brunkhill.com Subject: Re: Proposal Date: 9/12/06, 18:46 Attach: Yo Susan! My main squeeze! Haven’t heard from you for awhile. We need to go out to lunch sometime to see how things are 90an in your life. It’s the same old grind here at work. , 1 ‘ Informal ,, ‘ response ' ' ' told me about him a is our boss still being a Jerk? That stuff you. codple of months ago was hysterical. I get big laughs around here with those stories. George “The Giant Head’ Halkins F al request > Dear Mr. Halkins, orm > We are eagerly waiting for your proposal regarding the Thompson > Industries Project. Please submit the full document to us by this > Friday. W‘lfmyfifl" ” www.ablongman.com/johnsonweb2/13.2 For websites that offer free e—mail service, go to Figure 13.2: People often view the importance of e-mail differently. Here, a formal request is misunderstood. Also, Susan might have a bigger problem (notice the co line). m EluMall Guidelines to Keep in Mind When you are using e-mail, here are a few guidelines to keep in mind: E-mail is increasingly used for professional purposes—Not long ago, e-mail was primarily used for quick comments or nonessential information. Today, e—mail is the principal form of communication in most workplaces, so people expect e-mail messages to be professional and nonfrivolous. E-mail is a form of public communication—Your readers can purposely or mistakenly send your e—mail messages to countless others. So, you should not say things in an e—mail that you would not say openly to your supervi— sors, co—workers, or clients. E-mail is increasingly formal—In the past, readers forgave typos, mis— spellings, and bloopers in e—mail messages, especially when e-mail was new and difficult to use. Today, readers expect e-mails to be more formal and reflect the quality expected in other forms of communication. E-mail standards and conventions are still being formed—The use of e-mail in the workplace is still being worked out. So, you need to pay close atten— tion to how e—mail is used in your company and in your readers’ companies. Take Note Many companies are developing policies explaining how e-mail should be used. If your company has a policy on e-mail usage, you should familiarize yourself with it to avoid any problems. Legal Issues with E—Mail You should also keep in mind that legal constraints shape how e-mail should be used in the workplace. Here are four things to keep in mind: Your e-majls can be saved and used against you—Courts of law treat e—mail as written communication, equivalent to a memo or letter. Your messages can be saved and used against you or your company in court cases. Your workplace e-majls are owned by your employer—Employers are within their rights to read your e—mail without your knowledge or permission. Also, deleted e-mails can‘be retrieved from the company’s servers, and they can be used in a legal case. Copyright laws protect e-mail—E—mail, like any other written document, is protected by copyright law. So, you need to be careful not to use e—mails in any way that might violate copyright law. For example, if you receive an e-mail from a client, you caimot immediately post it to your company’s website without that client’s permission. Harassment and discrimination cases often hinge on evidence found in emails—Careless e-mails about personal relationships or appearances can be saved and used against the sender in a court case. lndiscreet comments about gender, race, or sexual orientation can also have unexpected conse- quences.Your “harmless” dirty jokes sent to your co—workers might end up being used by a lawyer to prove that you are creating a “hostile workplace environment.” For examples of corporate e-mail policies, go to www.ablongman.com/johnsonweb2/13.3 To read some classic e—mail blunders, go to www.ablongman.com/johnsonwebz/ 13.4 For more information on copyright law, go to Chapter 5, page 104. For more information on ethics, see Chapter 5, page 95. Features of E-Mail An e-mail is formatted similarly to a memo (Figure 13.3). Typical e—mail messages d i “ will have a header and body. They also have additional features like attachments an r ‘ signatures. l Basic Features of an Euih’iaii Re: What do we do now? - Message ‘ 1 For attaching l ‘ tiles ‘ I Runner@gomanlnd.net i To, cc, hoe, I com ‘ and subject : Harold'James@tu arossa. l ""63 bcc; i ‘ Subject: Re: What do we do now? Attach: l . l Cathryn and Harold, Message W93 I think we really need to do something today, because Friday is 1 ‘ Muse’s booked up with meetings. Can we touch base before you go home, ‘ response) Cathryn? V, ‘ Jose l Previous e-mail I I l from Gatmy“ > I’m going home a bit early today. There IS not much gorng on l ‘ (to whiCh Jose > today, and my daughter has an important soccer game this evening. - . , is responding) > Cathryn ‘ Header I . 2 The header has lines for To and Subject. Usually, there are also lines like cc, bcc, and Attachments, which allow you to expand the capabilities of the message. To line—Here is where you type the e—mail address of the person to. whom ‘ you are sending the e—mail.You can put multiple addresses on this line, l allowing you to send your message to many people at the same tune. cc and bcc lines—The cc and bcc lines are used to copy the message to people who are not the primary readers, like your superVisors or others who To learn about how e—mail has evolved, go to www.ablongman.com/johnsonweb2/13.5 Figure 13.3: A basic message has several different parts. In this message, the sender, Jose, is replying to Cathryn and copying (cc’ing) the message to Harold. might be interested in your conversation. The cc line shows your message’s recipient that others are receiving copies of the message too. The bcc line (“blind cc”) allows you to copy your messages to others without anyone else knowing. Subject line—The subject line signals the topic of the e-mail. Usually a small phrase is used. If the message is a response to a prior message, email programs usually automatically insert a “Re:” into the subject line. If the message is being forwarded, a “Fwdr” is inserted in the subject line. Attachments line—This line signals whether there are any additional files, pictures, or programs “attached” to the e-mail messageYou can attach whole documents created on your word processor, spreadsheet program, or presentation software. An attached document retains its original formatting and can be downloaded on the reader’s computer. Message Area The message area is where you will type your message to your readers. Like other written documents, your message should have an introduction, a body, and a conclu- sion.You should also be as brief as possible, because most people won’t read long e—mail messages. Introduction—The introduction should (1) define the subject, (2) state your purpose, and (3) state your main point. If you want the reader to do some- thing, you should mention it right here in the introduction, because most readers will not read your whole message. Body—The body should provide the information needed to support your e—mail’s main point or achieve your e-mail’s purposeYou should strip your comments down to only need-to—know information. Conclusion—The conclusion should (1) restate the main point and (2) look to the future. Here is not the place to tell your reader something important that you didn’t mention earlier in the e—mail or that you need them to do something, because most readers will not read your whole e—mail. Take Note A good rule of thumb is to keep the length of your message under one and a half screens. A shorter message minimizes the amount of scrolling required, increasing the likelihood that people will read your full message. The message area might also include these other kinds of text: Reply text—When you reply to a message, most e-mail programs allow you to copy parts of the original message into your message. These parts are often identified with > arrows running down the left margin (Figure 13.3). Links—You can also include direct links to websites (Figure 13.4). Most e—mail software will automatically recognize a webpage address like http://www.predatorconservation.org and make it a live link in the e—mail’s message area. Using the Message Area Lynx Habitat — Message Reply ‘c Forward File Deleteff i To: cc: VeraH@ussystems.net Lynx Habitat Date: 10/23/06, 18:46 a 1 file Signals that a file is attached Dear Vera, eard you are working on lynx preservation in Colorado. If you are Link to a website To this message, I have also attached a file I found on their website. it offers some really helpful insight into the habitat needs of the lynx in the Western US. Enjoy, Fred Jenkins Common Emoticons Figure 13.5: Symbols Meaning Emoticons are best used in emails r') Happyface between close ;—) Winking happy face colleagues and , S s d, friends. They can ‘0 urpnse ace show emotions that l Grim face are hard to convey .\ Smirking face 'n wr'tmg' :-( Unhappy face ,'-( Winking unhappy face '-x Silent face ( Cryng For helpful advice about using e—mail, go to www.ablongman.com/johnsonweb2/13.6 For more emoticons, go to www.ablongman.com/johnsonweb2/13.7 Figure 13.4: This e-mail includes a live link that will take the readers directly to the website mentioned. Also, an attached le is mentioned in the second paragraph. I l l Attachments—If you attach a file to your e-mail message, you should notify the readers in the message area that a file is attached. Otherwise, they may not notice it.Y0u might write something like, “To this e—mail, I have attached a file that. . . .” Emoticons—Another common feature in the message area is the use of emoticons. Used sparingly, they can help you signal emotions that are hard to convey in written text (Figure 13.5). When overused, emoticons will annoy some readers. Signalu re E—mail programs usually let you create a signature file that automatically puts a signature at the end of your messages. Some signatures are simple: Frank Randall, Marketing Assistant Genflex Microsystems 612-555-9876 frandall@genflexmicro.net Some signature files can be complex: .———. . ———————— —— Elizabeth Smith / \ _ / ———— —— Physics Goddess / / \(**)/ ————— Los Alamos NM ////// ' \/ ‘ ——— P.O. Box 4501345E //// / // : : ——— Los Alamos, NM 87545 // / / /\ '-— eliza455@lanl.gov // //..\\ Signature files allow you to personalize your message and add contact informa— tion. By creating a signature file, you can avoid typing your name, title, phone number, etc, at the end of each message you write. A llacllmcn is One of the advantages of e—mail over paper documents is the ability to send and receive electronic attachments. Attachments are files, pictures, or programs that your readers can download to their own computer. So, you can send your readers the 20—page report that you promised them. Or, you can send out pictures of the office holiday party. Sending attachments—If you would like to add an attachment to your e-mail message, click on the button that says, “Attach Document” or ‘Attachment” in your e-mail software program. Most programs will then Want to find a cool signature file? Go to www.ablongman.com/johnsonweb2/13.8 Blake Murnan ‘ . I ASSISTANT MARKETING MANAGER, MARKETING SERVICES, AGRiLiANC? N E‘N Agriliance is a multinational company that Ofi‘ers agricultural products and services. , BBfore long, e{118111 messages begin to pile up in How do you avoid “career—limiting moves” when using e—mail? It’s amazing how many times people make career-limiting moves over e-mail. They say something over e—mail that ends up hurting their career. I What makes e—mail valuable as a communication tool is what makes it so per— Step 2: Read and reply—Which messages ne d ' . ilous. Once released from your computer, e—mails become difficult to control or Step 3. Sort and archive_ 6 acuon nght HOW? recall. In the end, you do not know who is going end up with your e—mail. Therefore, . . as a professional in the workplace, you Should take great care in how you construct l 1 1 an e_mai1I If you follow these four step Here are some items to be aware of when constructing or responding to an e-mail: Wlth 8111311. s regularly, you will be able to work more efficiently ' Recipient—Know who you are sending your e-mail to. It sounds obvious, but do you want to be the one who sends a sensitive e-mail intended to go an indi- Step 1: Primj U70 Vidual but accidentally goes to the whole company? It happens—be careful. ‘ ’ 0 Carbon copy (ec)—Do not develop the reputation as a person who carbon copies (ccs) everyone, because people will begin to overlook your important e—mails. Direct your e—mails to the people who need to take action and copy the people who really need to be in the loop. ' Blind copy (bcc) —Always remember that there may be more people observing T k your actions than you think. 0 Spelling—Whether misspellings are unintentional or intentional, the recipient i may think you are incompetent or demonstrating a lack of respect by not i taking the time to correctly communicate. Most e—mail programs have auto— ; matic spellcheck—use it. 3 0 E-mail police—Your company may monitor your e—mails for items that are not [ l i work—related or may create a liability for the company. Therefore, try to limit Step 2: Read and RC )1 I l l non—work e—mails to a minimum. ' I «l E—mail messages tend to f ' I I I I all into thr ‘ .- . - - Always remember that your e-mails are a reflection of you, as a profess10nal, and matlonal messages (FYI) and junk Eesjisllscrzegfiggues' non;th “19333993, infor- ’ - ‘ I‘lng ac ion 8 ould receive the l ‘ therefore should be constructed and managed with great care. highest priority Emails th ~ . ‘ - at are mi N i . Junk can be deleted immediately ormatlonal messages can be read and deletEd' II I II I II II II If I I I I I I I _ II Now that you have " ' ‘ ' I prioritized your emails 3 I ' ' ' quire you to take action. Try using the “3—D methtgdi’i‘ orkmg Wlth the e‘mafls that re» Delegate—Can someone else or should someone else do this work for you? If someon ‘ . e else can, hit the Forw button and send him or her the message. ard want to attach. Receiving attachments—If someone sends you an attachment, your e-mail I open a textbox or Window that allows you to find and select the file you I l l Readin and Replyin to E-Mail g .I I program will use an icon to signal that a file is attached to the e—mail mes— D0 n0w_can you answer this I _ r ‘ sage. Click on that icon. Most e—mail programs will then allow you to save ¢ Delegate—Should someone can do what is being requested .eqrest “Sht HOW? If YOU I: I, l the document to your hard drive. From there, you can open the file. 8186 do this work? you should do it immediate] m W0 mums or 1688’ inabiihoaiilon on l ii : ‘ ' D0 now—Can I handle this Do late1-_S - USing "to do" . l I l Before opening attachments, make sure your virus protection software is request right now? thes ta I 01116 actipns require more time. Jot down lists With Online working properly. Many viruses enter computers through attachments. To avoid a virus, it is . D0 ,ater_8hould I handIe d: S {s on your to do” list. Also, write down a day gilentdars, see also a good idea to set your e-mail program so that attachments are not downloaded auto— this request later? an lme When You Will do these tasks. page:3 matically when they are received. Tired of unwanted email? For h at , o to www.ablongman.com/johnsonwe%2%’13.9 , i . ‘ ' . . n ' ' You might also decide to archive more impor- l ‘ Step 3: Sort and Archive . ' Managing E-Mall tam email messages as a way to keep a record of i i I When you are finished reading and T65130ng: You Should the“ Sort the remammg Step 1: Prioritize—Which messages your decisions and actions. E—mails can be H i 1 e—mails into folders. Even the simplest e—mail programs \Vlll allow you to create ‘ are the most important? archived in electronic form (eg, on your hard | i i folders for sorting your messages (Figure 13.6). ‘ _ Step 2: Read and replnyhiCh drive) or print form (printed out and filed). ‘ In most e—mail programs, you can also create filters 01 rules for your e—mall that _ ‘ m essages need action right now? will automatically sort your messages into folders. In your e-mail program, look for a Step 3: Sort and archive_wmch function called “Create Filter” or “Create Rule” or something similar. When this com- messages Should be saved? mand is selected, a box will usually appear that allows you to create filters that sort I Step 4: Purge—Which messages ‘ . . i .3 emails by sender, subject line, or keywords. Filters are a handy way to sort e—mafl, can be deleted? No matter hovs hard you try, e—mail messages Will i . especially if you receive many messages each day. 7 N 7 r 7 still pile up. So, once a week, you should set aside time to purge your e—mail account. Start the purg— ._:::A ~.3 Step Purge l Take Note Your email folders should reflect your activities at work, Each project ing process by doing something about all the messages piling up in your Inbox and i I should have its own folder. Each of your co-workers, especially your supervisor, should have your email account 5 other folders_ a separate folder too Be realistic about the messages you save. Will you ever need these messages , again? If these old messages are important, ask yourself whether they should then be ‘ archived on your hard drive or printed out and filed. If they don’t need to be kept, Mailboxes and Folders delete them. Figure 13.6: , Your email Email messages may be purged from your system, but they are often re- , program win aiiow tained on the server. An expert or investigator can recover these e-mails long after they i you to sort your were deleted. ‘ e-mails into folders. Some programs allow you to sort files automatically by Netiquette j keywords' Because e—mail is relatively new, we are still figuring out how it should be used. When lnbOX using the phone, you have a rather firm idea about the etiquette to be followedYou answer the phone with,“Hello.” Or, perhaps at work you might say something like, Folder Listv l h, i \7; ‘ “Hello, this is Brenda Chavez.” At work, if you answered the phone with, “Yup” or ‘ V Responded To : “Speak to me,” your caller might be a bit offended. v Future Projects i Like the phone, e—mail also has its own etiquette, or “netiquette.” Here are a dozen I 1 Archive 1 netiquette guidelines that you can follow in the workplace: ii i E'mai'5,a"e V Funn Stuff V Guideline 1: Be concise—Keep the length of your messages under a screen i sorted mm v y and a half. Longer messages probably won’t be read carefully. ‘ 3 these folders. I CYA i Guideline 2: Provide only need-to-know information—Decide who needs to i. i v Meetings 4 know what you have to say, and send them only information they need— l i nothing more. . ‘ i , v From Tracey ‘ I‘ 1st Quarter , Guideline 3: Treat the security of the message about the same as a message i on a postcard—Recognize that anyone can pass your message along or use 2nd Quarter it against you. If the message is confidential or proprietary, e—mail is not an appropriate way to send it. Guideline 4: Don’t say anything in an e-mail that you would not say in a meeting or to legal authorities—Hey, accidents happen.You might send - ' ‘ 'v a To find more tips on managing e-mail, go to 0 learn more about creating filters, go to V H I 1‘I-VWW-a'3'liil1g'11‘rlll-W'll/iOlmsmwe'l’z/ 13-10 «g * ' www.ablongman.com/johneonweb2/13.11 something embarrassing to the entire organization. Or, someone else might U . . . . 5mg Malling Lists (Listservs) ‘ ‘ ‘ l 1 do it for you. t l l l - - F. , . - - , . , , , - - - i Gmdehne 0. New e1 immediater iespond to a message that made you angry Mailing lists, commonly called listseivs 01. list servers, are a special feature of gmafl i 3 I. i ,1 01‘ upset—Give yourself time to cool off. You should never write e-mail When an email is sent to a mailin l. _ I] ‘ i ‘ when you are angry, because these little critters have a way of returning to subscribes to the list. g ISt’ the message 15 broadCaStEd t0 eVBI‘yOIie who : bite you. t Mailing lists are available on just about any topic, 3110“ng specialists to commu_ Guideline 6; Avoid using too much humor, especially irony 01. sarcasm_ nicate'widely with others in their field. In the technical workplace mailin li ts ~ In an e—mail, your witty quips rarely come off exactly as you intended, l essenual for keel)ng up t0 date with new developments and conv , t' g' S ale , u Remember that your e-mails can be easily misinterpreted or taken out of ’ you are a medical dOCtOn for example, a mailing llSt might alerfryfduliblsaliieivfidfi'g , ~ : - ~ - .- ouareasci t' " ' - - - 1 context. The Ameiican sense of humor, meanwhile, is often disturbing to y en lst, a mailing list might help you find others who are working in international audiences; so if your message is going overseas, keep the your TeseaTCh area. ‘1 t be misunderstood, paraphrase the meaning in your own message instead of UnityMail. ‘ l l ‘ forwarding his or her message or copying parts of it. ; ‘ humor to a minimum. Tak N t l V l . . . . . e 0 e Listserv is . ' i 1} ‘ Guideline 7: Be extra careful about excerpting or forwarding the e-mail of Twinkies, and Saran Wrap, hifizseljf 3:: 2:29 :f a EOfiware DFOduct. Like Kleenex, 1 ‘ othersfllf there is the remotest chance that someone else’s message could product. Other mailing list software, products includee $383,316; Te'ynhcilnymgus W'th the v FIS, ajor omo, and 1} 1‘ Gujdelme 8: Don’t be unpleasant in an email if you woum DOt be Whgolrgeepseplpilgrlflge tlo participate actively in mailing lists, conversing with specialists 7 ac {groun s or interests. Others like to “lurk” on mailin ' g lists, ‘ ‘ , unpleasant face to face—E—mail prOVides a false sense of security, much reading the messages but alm t ' ' ' ' - - like drivmg in a car. Remember that those are real people on that 03 never PmlClDatlflg 111 the discussmns l information superhighway, and they have feelings. Plus, they can forward M . . and save your abusive or harassing messages and use them as evidence f1ndlfl§ a I\lalllllg LlSt ‘ ‘ ; a ainst rou. Th , . . . . . . l g I .3 I . e best place to search fOi a speCific mailing list is at the CataList site (http'// ‘ Guideline 9: Never send anything that could be proprietary—There have “W‘V‘lsofi'Com/catahSt-htnfll- This Site catalogs all the mailing lists that us ts l been some classic cases where classified information or trade secrets SOfiVVare- Here, 37011 Can use keywords to search for lists on a specific topicethai: i etrV ‘ n er— have been accidentally sent to competitors or the media via e—mail. If the ESlS YOU. ; information is proprietary, use traditional routes like the regular mail or t - . mailing lists the 7 b ‘ . i a e . su scrib Th 7 ‘ . C011“ I subscribe 3 e to- ‘33 can P1 Obably send you information about how to i Guideline 10: Don’t flame, spam, or chain-letter people at work—If you must, do these things from your personal computer at home. At work, ' I assume these activities Will ultimately be used against you.You might 811150111)ng 311d UIISUJJSCI‘HJng f0 21 List ‘ be fired. . i ' To subscribe to a list, you Will need to send a message to the owner of the mailing ' ‘ Guideline 11.111111]; twice before you send “urgent” messages that are list. In the “T0” line of your e-mail, you should type the address of the mailin l' t owner. Then, in the message area of the e-mail, type g 18 , Xou can also ask other students, professors, colleagues, and supervisors about the l making their way across the net—There are lots of hoaxes about computer ‘ viruses “erasing your hard drive.” These hoaxes gain new life When some sub .b 4, I e 1 . gullible person starts sending them to all his or her co—workers. Some virus 5m 6 mname) alerts are real, but most are not. Wait a day or two to see if the threat is real some mailing lists require You to State your name also I. before you warn everyone you know. 3 l ‘ subscribe <llstname> <YOUrfir5tname> <yourlasmame> Guideline 12: Be forgiving of the grammatical mistakes of others—but don’t make them yourself — Some people treat e—mail informally so they To unsubscr-lbe from . . ' ‘ ’ . a I ll, “ ' a) u - ,, rarely reVise (though they should). Grammar mistakes and misspellings ls you can use the unSUbSCHbe 0T SIQHOff command. happen—so you should forgive the sender. On the other hand, these mis— teaks and typos make the sender look stoopid. Don’t send out sloppy Signofi (“Smame> ‘ ‘ . email messages. unsubscribe <|istname> (continued) Want to learn more about email netiquette? Go to www.ablongman.com/johnsonweb2/13.12 Want to know if a virus is a hoax? Go to www.ablongman.com/johnsonweb2/13.13 Millet} ltjt:)u1.[i,r;’,k,‘-_: Most mailing lists “all immediately send you a file that describes how the list works, including a list of Frequently Asked Questions. A mailing list may also auto— matically ask you to confirm your subscription by e—mail. Participating in the Discussion Once you have subscribed to a mailing list, you will begin receiving mail. Usually, the best way to participate is to reply to someone else’s e-mail. Hitting the Reply button will automatically put the address of the mailing list in the “T0” line of your e—mail message.You can then type your message. Because your message to a mailing list may be sent to thousands of other people, you need to be especially aware of netiquette. it's one thing to look careless or foolish in emails sent to your friends, but thoughtless e-mails to a mailing list can do quick damage to your reputation. Flaming is a special problem on mailing lists. Sometimes debates on mailing lists turn ugly when two or more subscribers start quarreling with each other. For the most part, flaming is a waste of time for the participants, and flames are annoying to the other subscribers on the list.You should avoid participating in these kinds of e—mail exchanges. What Is Instant Messaging? Variations of instant messaging (1M) have been around for some time. Recently, however, instant messaging has started to become an important tool in the techni— cal workplace. People now use instant messaging to communicate through their computers, wireless phones, and personal digital assistants (PDAs). Unlike e—mail, instant messaging happens in real time. When you hit “Send,” your message will immediately appear on the receivers’ screens (Figure 13.7). They can then respond, sending you an instant message. Take Note Instant messaging is called "synchronous" because the conversation happens in real time. Email is “nonsynchronous” because messages are saved in the receiver's Inbox until he or she is ready to read and respond to them. Some instant messaging programs will allow you to send live audio or video. With a microphone and/or digital camera (webcam) mounted on your computer, you can let other people see and hear you talking. To find a listserv on a subject that interests you, go to www.ablongman.com/johnsonweb2/13.14 These buttons add or remove participants. Figure 13.7: instant messaging allows you to speak synchronously with others. Here, Sara is about to send a message to Tom and Jose. These buttons allow you to page or email a participant. Tom: Hey Folks, let’s get to work on this report. Contact GPOUDS Jose: Yeah, let’s go. Project 1 Sara: l’ve been looking over the draft Tom sent out, and i think it looks pretty good so far. i think the introduction needs a little work. Right now, it doesn’t really explain clearly why waste treatment is a problem i here at Toledo plant. ‘ Discussion in progress Tom: Isn’t that obvious? I mean, doesn't everybody see waste as a problem? Sara: li’m not sure. it’s obvious to us, but the people at the main office don’t always see things the same way. Jose: I’m with Sara. i think we need to be very clear i about the importance of the problem up front (the introduction). These buttons add video and audio. Message Sara ’5 next message All we need to do is add a couple sentences that state some of the more obvious issues. You know, show them the cost of doing nothing. Using lnstant Messaging Want to find websites that offer free instant messaging? Go to www.ablongman.com/johnsonWeb2/13.15 Most instant messaging programs ask you to sign in with a passwordfl‘hen, you can create a list of other people with whom you want to converse. To begin a conver— sation, you can check your IM program to see who is on the network. If they are on the network, you can send them a message. Take Note Instant messaging has always been a good way to stay in touch with friends. Increasingly, though, co-workers are starting to use instant messaging to hold meetings and collaborate on projects. With video and audio capabilities, people across the country can have a live meeting through their computers. Here are a few guidelines for using instant messaging at work: Schedule instant messaging meetings—If you are going to use instant mes— saging to meet with people, you should schedule a time for the Virtual meet— ing. Without a scheduled meeting, you may not be able to pull people away from their other work. Write concise messages—Instant messaging conversations usually move along quickly, especially if you are talking with more than one person. So, keep your messages short and easy to read.You might learn to use some of the common instant messaging abbreviations to keep the messages short (Figure 13.8). The common emoticons for e—mail also work well. Instant Messaging Abbreviations Figure 13.8: Abbreviation Meaning 21:38:?ng1513m AFAIK as far as I know abbreviation8_ B4” blew” lgiiiiiifheip BBL be back later you communicate BTDT been there done that more efficiently F2F face to face 6 grin GDR grinning, ducking, and running HTH hope this helps lMO in my opinion lTLYK just to let you know LOL laughing out loud TTFN ta ta for now WFM works for me For websites that discuss using lM, go to www.ablongman.com/johnsonweb2/13.16 More iM abbreviations can be found at www.ablongman.com/johnsonwe[12/1347 Cut the chitchat—lnstant messaging can be fun, but time is valuable. When collaborating with others, keep the personal comments to a minimum. Use instant messaging at work only when necessary—The problem with instant messaging is that others need to respond right away. If they are doing other important work, they may not be able to write back. So, if your message does not need immediate attention, you might send an e—mail instead. Instant messaging is a valuable new tool that is becoming as common as e—mail in the workplace. As companies look to cut costs and improve efficiency, instant messag~ ing is a good way to replace in—person meetings, while allowing people to collaborate through their computers. E—mail is an essential tool in the workplace, and instant messaging is quickly growing in popularity. These tools allow you to communicate, collaborate, and connect to others. 0 E-mail is a hybrid technology that combines the functions of the phone, memos, and letters. In the workplace, e—mail should be used for professional purposes only, because it is a public form of communication and should always convey professionalism. An e—mail has the following features: header, message area, signature, and attachments. 0 Managing e—mail requires some discipline and diligence. To avoid e—mail glut, you need to (l) prioritize, (2) read and reply, (3) sort and archive, and (4) purge your messages. 0 As you are reading and responding to your e-mails, remember to delegate, do now, or do later. Netiquette involves guidelines for politeness and ethical behavior with e—mail. Mailing lists, often called listservs, are good ways to stay in touch with your colleagues and professional groups. Instant messaging is a synchronous way to communicate and hold “Virtual meetings” with other people. rn Ex 0% '09 70m 25: m n _| m Individual and Team Projects . Use a search engine to find a special-interest group on the Internet that you might like to join. Send the webmaster a polite e-mail that requests information about the group. Pay special attention to the content and organization of your e—mail. Also, pay attention to netiquette, trying to avoid any statements that might offend the recipient of your e—mail. . One of your co—workers likes to send out jokes to your whole work team. The jokes are tasteful, but they clog up your lnbox. Write an e—mail to your co- worker in which you tactfully ask him to reduce the number of jokes he sends out. . Look at your own e-mail account. Use the e-mail management scheme described in this chapter (prioritizing, reading and replying, sorting and archiving, and purg— ing) to clean up your Inbox and purge old e—mails. Try to manage your e—mail for three weeks with this system, spending some time once a week cleaning up your e—mail account. . Find an e—mail that could be misread to sound angry or nasty. Then, rewrite the e—mail in a way that avoids the potential nastiness. If you do not have a sample e—mail, ask one of your classmates or co—workers to send you an e—mail that uses an angry tone. . Read the Case Study at the end of this chapter. Pretend you are Jane. Write an e—mail to your co—workers in which you explain your complaint to your former supervisor. Trade your e-mail with one of the other people in your class to see whether you would handle Jane’s problem similarly. Collaborative Projects 1. With a group ofclassmates, develop your own set of netiquette guidelines for your class or univerSity. What are some guidelines for proper use of email in the classroom? How can these guidelines be expanded to suit the entire university? 2. Using instant messaging, collaborate with a group of classmates to compose a memo to your college or company. In the memo, discuss a specific problem on campus (e.g., the need for better food, safety, faster computers) and ask what can be done about the problem. Pay attention to how instant messaging helps or im— pedes your ability to compose the memo. When you are finished with the memo discuss how the Wii'ting process changes with instant messaging. , 3. With a group, use e-mail or instant messaging to have a practice “flame” about a specific topic (e.g., television program, politician, musician, college team). Without bemg offensive, argue emphatically about the topic, trying to score points on the other members of the flame. As you flame with your group, notice your reactions to their e—inails. Does each e-mail add to the stress and tension, rarer resolving the conflict? What are some ways you might stop the flaming? How can you and your group restore good relations using e—mail? i‘_————_—* Exposed Jane Fredrickson was asked to join an existing work team at her office. The group had been together for a long time, and they all got along really well. Jane was exerted about working with some new people. Unfortunately, the closeness of her new work team soon became a problem. The others on the team had their own language and code of conduct. They joked around with each other with instant messaging. They sent each other pictures of their children in the bathtub. They sent each other dirty jokes. Frankly, Jane was becoming fed up with their behavior. So, one day she decided to vent her annoyance in an e—mail to Harold Grimes, her former su— pervisor. After listing her complaints, using words like“annoying,” “idiotic,” and “unprofessional,” she wrote,“l wish someone would do something about these people and their juvenile antics.” I . A week later, Jane’s supervisor, Alisha Jones, sent an e—mail to the work team, asking them to put an end to the fun and games (Figure A). To her e—mail, she attached a couple of files that spelled out the company’s rules for using e-mail and 1nstant messaging. She also mentioned that there had been a complaint. I ' , To Jane’s horror, part of her original message to Harold was copied below Alisha 3 message. Harold had apparently forwarded part of Jane’s original message to Alisha. And, Alisha had simply forwarded it to the group with her own message added on. Needless to say, the other members of Jane’s work team were gomg to be upset. Even though her name was not on the message, Jane knew they would figure out who had complained about them. What should she do now? l Oops. Here is part of Jane’s original message. Egroblems with Using E=Mail Figure A: Part of Jane’s message is copied below Harold's. Netiquette — Message L—Team201 @supertech.com HGrimes@supertech.com Subject: Netiquette Date: 3/26/06, 10:23 Attach: EE‘i2flles l Hey Team, . Listen, we’ve had a complaint about all the e-mail chatter and fooling 3. i around. The company has some clear policies about using e-mall = i‘ and instant messaging (see the attached files). So, I want all of you ‘ to read these files and start complying with the corporate rules. I If we have any more complaints, I’m going to sign all of you up for the company’s e-mail netiquette workshop. Don’t make me do that. Alisha Forwarded Message -------------------------------------------------------------- -- > Alisha, a former member of my team has told me about some > problems with e-mail and instant messaging within your team. You > better do something about this problem before upper management > receives a formal complaint from her. Harold Grimes ‘ >> These people are just so unprofessional! They are continually >> sending out annoying e-mails and dirty jokes. Some of them are >> truly idiotic. | wish someone would do something about these :_. >> people and their juvenile antics. Ii; ...
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This note was uploaded on 08/25/2011 for the course ENGLISH 420 taught by Professor Staff during the Summer '11 term at Purdue University-West Lafayette.

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