22 - 644 The Mole Henry Espinoza knew this proposal was...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–14. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 2
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 4
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 6
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 8
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 10
Background image of page 11

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 12
Background image of page 13

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 14
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: 644 The Mole Henry Espinoza knew this proposal was important to his company,Valen Industries. If the proposal was successful, it could be worth millions of dollars in short-term and long— term projects for his employer. For Henry, Winning the project meant a likely promo— tion to vice president and a huge raise in salary The company’s CEO was calling him daily to check up and see if it was going well. That meant she was getting stressed out about the project. Through the grapevine, Henry knew his com- pany really had only one major competitor for the project. So, the odds were good that Valen Industries would win the contract. Of course, Henry and his team needed to put together an iri— novative and flawless proposal to win, because their major competitor was going all out to get this project. Then, one day something interesting hap— pened. One of Henry’s team members, Vera Houser, came to him with an e-mail from one of her friends, who worked for their main competi- tor. In the e—mail, this person offered to giveValen Industries a draft of its competitor’s proposal. Moreover, this friend would pass along any future drafts as the proposal evolved. In the e—mail,Vera’s friend said he was very frustrated working at his “slimy” company, and he was looking for a way out. He also revealed that his company was getting “inside help” on the proposal, but Henry wasn’t sure what that meant. Essentially, this person was hintng that he would give Henry’s team a copy of the competitor’s proposal and work as a mole if they considered hiring him at Valen Industries. Henry knew he would gain a considerable advantage over his only competitor if he had a draft of its proposal to look over. The ability to look at future drafts would almost ensure that he could beat his competitor. Certainly, he thought, with this kind of money on the line, a few rules could be bent. And it seemed that his competitor was already cheating by receiving inside help. Henry went home to think it over. What would be the ethical choice in this situa— tion? How do you think Henry should handle this interesting opportunity? Chapter 21 “0’9, ’43:, ‘ l ‘ Proposals - 6) ‘ II? in" may». In this chapter, you will learn: About the different kinds of activity reports and how they are used in the workplace. The basic features of activity reports. How to determine the rhetorical situation of an activity report. How to organize and draft an activity report. Strategies for using an appropriate style. How to design and format activity reports. The importance of editing and proofreading activity reports. Basic Features of Activity Reports 646 Types of Activity Reports 646 Planning and Researching Activity Reports 656 Organizing and Drafting Activity Reports 659 Help: Making and Using PDFs 663 Using Style and Design in Activity Reports 664 Revising, Editing, and Proofreading 665 Chapter Review 666 Exercises and Projects 666 Case Study: Bad Chemistry 669 Today, companies are using computer networks to create management structures that are less hierarchical. As a result, companies require fewer levels of man- agers than before, because computer networks help top executives better communi- cate with employees throughout the company. These “flatter” management structures require more communication, quicker feed- back, and better accountability among employees in the company. As a result, activ- ity reports are more common than ever in the technical workplace. Here are a few examples of kinds of activity reports and how they might be used: ' An electrical engineer would write a progress report that discusses a wire harness her team is developing for a new car. 0 A scientist would give a briefing to a government agency on the possibilities of a hydrogen-powered passenger train. ' A chemist would write an incident report to explain a recent accident in the laboratory in which chlorine gas was released. 0 A technician might write a lab report that presents his finding of malaria in mosquitoes captured in South America. Activity reports are used to objectively present ideas or information within a company. Writing these reports should be a part of the regular flow of your work- week. In this chapter, you will learn how to compose these smaller reports quickly and efficiently. Basic Features of Activity Reports An activity report usually includes the following features, which can be modified to suit the needs of the situations in which the report will be used: Introduction Summary of activities Results of activities or research Future activities or research Incurred or future expenses Graphics Keep in mind that activity reports are used for a variety of purposes.You should adjust this pattern to suit your needs. Figure 22.1 shows the basic pattern for an ac- tivity report. Sections can be added and subtracted from this basic pattern, depend- ing on your reasons for writing the report. Types of Activity Reports Even though the various types of activity reports are similar in most ways, they are called a variety of names that reflect their different purposes. Activity reports share one goal—to objectively inform readers about (1) what happened, (2) what is hap— pening, and (3) what will happen in the near future. Chapter 22 Activity Reports Basic Pattern for an Activity Report Introduction Summary of Activities Results of Activities Supporting graphics and illustrations can be used Future throughout the ACtIVIt'es body of the activity report. Expenses Conclusion The most common types of activity reports include the following: ' Progress reports 0 Briefings and white papers ' Incident reports 0 Laboratory reports Progress Reports A progress report, also called a status report, is written to inform management about the progress or status of a project. These reports are usually written at regular intervals—weekly, biweekly, or monthly—t0 update management on what has hap— pened since the last progress report was submitted.Your company’s management may also periodically request a progress report to stay informed about your or your team’s activities. A typical progress report will provide the following information: 0 a sununary of completed activities 0 a discussion of ongoing activities 0 a forecast of future activities Inns of Activity Reports Figure 22.1: Progress reports and briefings emphasize what happened, the results of the activity, and what will happen in the future. 647 ' Figure 22.2, for example, shows a progress report that is designed to update man— ; agement on a project. A Progress Report Figure 22.2: A . l ‘ progress report l: describes the - - 1 ‘ I ll‘ Hanson En ineerin team activities Briefings and Wlute Papers ‘ i ‘ 3' g g and discusses Briefings and white papers are used to inform management or clients about an im— future activmes' portant issue. Typically, briefings are presented verbally, while white papers are pro— . l i . March 15. 2006 Vided in print. Occasionally, briefings will also appear as “briefs” in written form. f I To: Charlie Peterson, Director Briefings and white papers typically present gathered facts in a straightforward From: Sue Griego, Iota Team Manager and impartial way. They include the following kinds of information: Subject: Progress Report, March 15 - a summary of the facts Subject, ‘l——> This month, we made good progress toward developing a new desalinization method 0 a discussion of the importance of these facts and I l f ‘ purpose! that rcqmres less energy than “admonal me'h0d5‘ ' a forecast about the importance of these facts in the future ‘ 1 main oint are ' j ‘ identified up Our activities this month have centered around testing the solar desalinization An effective briefing presents the facts as concisely as possible, leaving time for ’ , . . . . . . _ _ . . I - ‘ ‘ front. (Ti that we dlsfussed w'ih y 01.1 earlier “"5 year' with 501‘" panels’ we are trying questlons and answers. When you brief an audience on your sublect, try to do so as p mate the sun 5 natural desallnlzatlon of water (Figure A). In our system, _ _ _ I I _ _ electricity from the photovoltaic solar panels evaporates the water to create “clouds” ObJeCUVely as DOSSlble- Then, mterpret the Importance Of those fads based 0n 6V1" : ‘ Ongomg in a chamber, similar to the way the sun makes clouds from ocean water. The salt dence, not on speculation. - ; ‘ activities are deposits are then removed with reverse osmosis, and freshwater is removed as steam. Briefings and White papers typically do not advocate for any specific Side or I descr'bed heater course of action. Instead, they present the facts in a straightforward way and offer an , objectively. objective assessment of what those facts mean. It is up to the readers to decide what actions are appropriate. Figure 22.3 shows the first page of a six—page white paper from the US. PV solar ‘ The graphic x» panel \5 l : i su orts the . . . . I ‘ te membrane Env1r0nmental Protection Agency. The white paper discusses the effects of mercury " salt water cloud in our environment. i chamber ' salt solution l l . ’1 l s ' e l, ‘ teilre Figure A: The Desalinizor Ineldent RepOI ts l“ l - . . . . l” ‘ \j\We are succeeding on a small scale. Right now, our solar desalinator can produce an IHCIdFHt Tefports describe an (WEI-1t, usually an accrdent or irregular occurrence, average 2.3 gallons of freshwater an hour. Currently, we are working with the system they Identlfy What Correcuve aCtlonS have been taken- AS Wlth Other klnds 0f aCtIVlty to improve its efficiency, and we soon hope to be producing 5 gallons of freshwater reports, incident reports present the facts as objectively as possible. They provide the i a“ “0‘”- following information: ‘ Re ort ends 1 Wig] a look to We are beginning to sketch out plans for a large—scale solar desalinization plant that 0 a summary of what happened (the facts) the future and would be able to produce thousands of gallons of freshwater per hour. We will . a discussion of Why it happened discuss ourideas with ou at the A ril l7 meetin . . , . . . j a brief y p g 0 a description of how the s1tuat10n was handled r COHCIUSiOH. Our supplies and equipment expenses for this month were $8,921. Looks like things ' a discussion Of hOW the problem Will be avoided in the future v i are goin well. E—mail me if you have questions. . , _ _ i. ‘ g It IS tempting, especrally when an accrdent was your fault, to make excuses or ; offer apologies, but an incident report is not the place. As with other activity reports, ‘ you should concentrate on the facts. Describe what happened as honestly and clearly as possible.You can make excuses or apologize later. _ ‘ Figure 22.4 shows a typical incident report in which management is notified of an i ‘ l accident in a laboratory. r v i ' r f 649 Chapter22 «° ’th r . . t . . . _ _ V ,7 __ Wpeso Activity Reports 03°- 43) H .. g .l ., , .,_‘ .1 . ‘ . . > . i . . . Actmty Reports exegesis; Background on the subject is offered. Shows that more information is available elsewhere. A White Paper Subject and main point are Agency-wide effort to protect people and wildlife from exposure to the toxic pollutant mercury. identified up front Sources and Fate of Mercury in the Emironment ‘ , ‘ Like all elements. the same amount of mercury has existed on the planet since the Earth was formed. 1 However, the amount of mercury mobilized and released into the environment has increased since the l l , Facts are 1 i presented objectively. L NIERCURY WHITE PAPER Tire Utility Hazardous Air Pollutaan Regulatory Determination To reduce the risk mercury poses to people's health, EPA Administrator Carol M. Browner announced that the Environmental Protection Agency will regulate cmim’ons of mercury and other air toxics from coal- and oil-fired clecuic utility steam generating units (power plants). EPA plans to propose a regulation to control air toxics emissions. including mercury. from coal» and oil-fired power plants by the end of 2003. This regulation will he one more important piece of an beginning of the industrial age. Mercury moves through the environment as a result of both natural and human activities The human activities that are most responsible for causing mercury to enter the environment are bunring materials (such as batteries), frrels (such as coal) that contain mercury. and certain industrial processes These activities produce air polltrtion containing mercury. Based on EPA‘s National Toxics Inventory. the highest emitters of mercury to the air include coal— buming power plants, municipal waste combustors, medical waste incinerators and hazardous waste combustors Mercury emi$ions from these and other sources are transported through the air and eventually deposit to water and land, where humans and wildlife are exposed. Mos of the mercury entering the environment is the result ofair emissions: however, mercury also can directly contaminate land and water as a result of the release ofindustrial wastewatcr or from the disposal of waste-containing batteries and other sources of mercury. Once mercury enters Waters. either directly or through air deposition. it can bioaccumulate in fish and animal tissue in its most toxic form. metlrylmercury. Bioaccumulation means that the concentration of mercury in predators at the top of the food web (for example. predatory fish and fish-eating birds and mammals) can be thousands or even millions of times greater than the concentrations of mercury found in the water. Mercury deposition can occur very close to the source or. depending on the chemical form in which it is emitted, it can be transported great distances — even crossing intemational borders, The highest deposition rates in the U.S. ocour in the southern Great Lakes, the Ohio Valley, the Northeast and scattered areas in the Southeast. Approximately 60 percent of the mercury deposition that occurs in the US. comes from domestic human-made sources of pollution. The remaining 40 percent comes from human~made sources located outside of the U.S., rte-emitted mercury from hiaoric U.S. sources. and natural sources While the US. contributes only about 3 percent of the global atmospheric pool of mercury, it still contributes more than it receives. Approximately two—thirds of US, emigions are transported outside our borders. More information on the sources fate. zurd risks of mercury in the environment can be found in EPA's 1997 Mercury Report to Congress and 1998 Utility Air Toxics Report to Congress. Source: US Environmental Protection Agency, 2003. Figure 22.3: A white paper presents technical information objectively, allowing readers to make decisions based on the facts. Subject and purpose are stated up front. What happened is described objectively. What was done about it is noted. An Incident Report Red Hills Health Sciences Center Testing and Research Division 201 Hospital Drive, Suite A92 Red Hills, CA 92698 March 10, 2006 To: Brian Jenkins, Safety Assurance Officer From: Hal Chavez, Testing Laboratory Supervisor Subject: Incident Report: Fire in Laboratory I am reporting a fire in Testing Laboratory 5, which occurred yesterday, March 9, 2006, at 3:34 pm. The fire began when a sample was being warmed with a bunsen burner. A laboratory notebook was left too close to the burner, and it caught fire. One of our laboratory assistants, Vera Cather, grabbed the notebook and threw it into a medical waste container. The contents of the waste container then lit on fire, filling the room with black smoke. At that point, another laboratory assistant, Robert Jackson, grabbed the fire extinguisher and emptied its contents into the waste container, putting out the fire. The overhead sprinklers went off, dousing the entire room. Even though everyone seemed fine, we decided to send all lab personnel down to the emergency room for an examination. While we were in the waiting room, Vera Cather developed a cough and her eyes became red. She was held for observation and released that evening when her condition was stable. The rest of us were looked over by the emergency room doctors, and they suggested that we stay out of the laboratory until it was thoroughly cleaned. I asked the hospital’s HazMat team to clean up the mess that resulted from the fire. We had been working with samples of Borrelia brugdorferi bacteria, which causes Lyme disease. I was not sure if the Figure 22.4: An incident report is not the place to make apologies or place blame. You should state the facts as objectively as possible. (continued) Chapter 22 Activity Reports 'Iypes of 6 5 1 Activity Reports The HazMat team will be charging us $2,405 for the cleaning. The l water damage to the laboratory was about $3,529. We will pay these The costs are specified. What will happen in the future is described. Contact information concludes the memo. 652 waste container held any of our discarded samples. So, I thought it appropriate to clean up the laboratory with the utmost care. Even if the samples were in the waste container, it would be unlikely that the bacteria survived the fire, but I asked the HazMat team to do a Type 3 cleaning anyway. costs out of our operating budget for now. We will file a claim with the Center’s insurance company. In the future, we will be more careful about fire hazards in the laboratory. We are currently developing policies to avoid these kinds of situations in the future. We will also develop an action and - evacuation plan to handle these sorts of situations if they occur agam. Thank you for your attention. If you have any questions or would like to talk further about this incident, please call me at 5—9124. Laboratory Reports Laboratory reports are written to describe experiments, tests, or inspections. If you have taken a laboratory class, you are no doubt familiar with lab reports. These reports describe the experiment, present the results, and discuss the results. Lab reports typically include the following kinds of information: I a summary of the experiment (methods) ' a presentation of the results ' a discussion of the results Lab reports, like other activity reports, emphasize the facts and data. Here is not the place to speculate or develop a new theory. Instead, your lab report should present the results as objectively as possible and use those results to support the reasoned discussion that follows. Figure 22.5 shows an example of a laboratory report. In this report, the writer describes the results of the testing as objectively as possible. Cha pter 22 Activity Reports 0 ) . . ' . 0’, 43. . r l 'l“."‘,"‘§ )Jl‘:,-""' " r' flifi’é‘a‘é}. Figure 22.4: (continued) A Lab Report The introduction states the subject, ———> purpose, and main point. Methods are described, ——'——> explaining how the study was done. FEND-LAB, INC. 2314 Universal St., Suite 192 San Francisco, CA 94106 (325) 555—1327 \mmnfendlabcalcom Test Address Mold Analysis Report NewGen Information Technology, Report Number: 818237—28 LLC Date of Sampling: 091206 3910 S. Randolph Arrival Date: 091406 Slater, CA 93492 Analysis Date: 091906 Client Technician: Alice Valles Brian Wilson Phone: 650555—1182 Fax: 650—555—2319 e—mail: [email protected] Lab Report: Mold Test In this report, we present the results of our testing for mold at the offices of NewGen Information Technology, at 3910 S. Randolph in Slater, California. Our results show above—normal amounts of allergenic mold, which may lead to allergic reactions among the residents. Testing Methods On 12 September 2006, we took samples from the test site with two common methods: Lift Tape Sampling and Bulk Physical Sampling. Lzfi Tape Sampling. We located 10 areas around the building where we suspected mold or spores might exist (e.g., water stains, dusty areas, damp areas). Using 8-cm—wide strips of transparent tape, we lifted samples and pressed them into the nutrient agar in petri dishes. Each sample was sealed and sent to our laboratory, where it was allowed to grow for one week. Types of Activity Reports Figure 22.5: A lab report walks readers through the methods, results, and discussion. Then, it offers any conclusions, based on the facts. (continued) 653 Results are presented objectively, without interpretation. 654 Bulk Physical Sampling. We located 5 additional areas where we observed significant mold growth in ducts or on walls. Using a sterilized scraper, we removed samples from these areas and preserved them in plastic bags. In one place, we cut a 1—inch-square sample from carpet padding because it was damp and contained mold. This sample was saved in a plastic bag. All the samples were sent to our laboratory. At the laboratory, the samples were examined through a microscope. We also collected spores in a vacuum chamber. Mold species and spores were identified. Results of Microscopic Examination The following chart lists the results of the microscope examination: Location Mold Found Break room counter Trichoderma Normal growth Geotrichum Corner, second floor Normal growth Cladosporium Heavy growth Penicillium spores Corkboard in bathroom Normal growth Descriptions of molds found: Trichoderma: Trichoderma is typically found in moistened paper and unglazed ceramics. This mold is mildly allergenic in some humans, and it can create antibiotics that are harmful to plants. Geotrichum: Geotrichum is a natural part of our environment, but it can be mildly allergenic. It is usually found in soil in potted plants and on wet textiles. Cladosporium: Cladosporium can cause serious asthma and it can lead to edema and bronchiospasms. In chronic cases, this mold can lead to pulmonary emphysema. Penicillium: Penicillium is not toxic to most humans in normal amounts. It is regularly found in buildings and likely poses no threat. Chapter 22 Activity Reports Figure 22.5: (continued) Results are interpreted and discussed. The conclusion restates the main point and recommends action. Discussion of Results It does not surprise us that the client and her employees are experiencing mild asthma attacks in their office, as well as allergic reactions. The amount of Cladosporium, a common culprit behind mold—caused asthma, is well above average. More than likely, this mold has spread throughout the duct system of the building, meaning there are probably no places where employees can avoid coming into contact with this mold and its spores. The other molds found in the building could be causing some of the employees’ allergic reactions, but it is less likely. Even at normal amounts, Geotrichum can cause irritation to people prone to mold allergies. Likewise, Trichoderma could cause problems, but it would not cause the kinds of allergic reactions the client reports. Penicillium in the amounts found would not be a problem. The results of our analysis lead us to believe that the Cladosporium is the main problem in the building. Conclusions The mold problem in this building will not go away over time. Cladosporium has obviously found a comfortable place in the air ducts of the building. It will continue to live there and send out spores until it is removed. We suggest further testing to confirm our findings and measure the extent of the mold problem in the building. If our findings are confirmed, the building will not be safely habitable until a professional mold remover is hired to eradicate the mold. Ignoring the problem would not be wise. At this point, the residents are experiencing mild asthma attacks and occasional allergic reactions. These symptoms will only grow worse over time, leading to potentially life-threatening situations. Contact us at (325) 555—1327 if you would like us to further explain our methods and/ or results. Wpes of Activity Reports Figure 22.5: (continued) Results are presented objectively, without interpretation. 654 Bulk Physical Sampling. We located 5 additional areas where we observed significant mold growth in ducts or on walls. Usmg a sterilized scraper, we removed samples from these areas and preserved them in plastic bags. In one place, we cut a lunch-square sample from carpet padding because it was damp and contained mold. This sample was saved in a plastic bag. All the samples were sent to our laboratory. At the laboratory, the samples were examined through a microscope. We also collected spores in a vacuum chamber. Mold specres and spores were identified. Results of Microscopic Examination I The following chart lists the results of the microscope examination: Mold Found Location Break room counter Trichoderma Normal growth Geotrichum Corner, second floor Normal growth Cladosporium Air ducts Heavy growth Penicillium spores Corkboard in bathroom Normal growth Descriptions of molds found: Trichoderma: Trichoderma is typically found in moistened paper and unglazed ceramics. This mold is mildly allergenic in some humans, and it can create antibiotics that are harmful to plants. Geotrichum: Geotrichum is a natural part of our environment, but it can be mildly allergenic. It is usually found in soil in potted plants and on wet textiles. Cladosporium: Cladosporium can cause serious asthma and it can lead to edema and bronchiospasms. In chronic cases, this mold can lead to pulmonary emphysema. Penicillium: Penicillium is not toxic to most humans in normal amounts. It is regularly found in buildings and likely poses no threat. Chapter 22 Activity Reports Figure 22.5: (continued) Results are / interpreted and discussed. The conclusion restates the/ main point and recommends action. Discussion of Results It does not surprise us that the client and her employees are experiencing mild asthma attacks in their office, as well as allergic reactions. The amount of Cladosporium, a common culprit behind mold—caused asthma, is well above average. More than likely, this mold has spread throughout the duct system of the building, meaning there are probably no places where employees can avoid coming into contact with this mold and its spores. The other molds found in the building could be causing some of the employees’ allergic reactions, but it is less likely. Even at normal amounts, Geotrichum can cause irritation to people prone to mold allergies. Likewise, Trichoderma could cause problems, but it would not cause the kinds of allergic reactions the client reports. Penicillium in the amounts found would not be a problem. The results of our analysis lead us to believe that the Cladosporium is the main problem in the building. Conclusions The mold problem in this building will not go away over time. Cladosporium has obviously found a comfortable place in the air ducts of the building. It will continue to live there and send out spores until it is removed. We suggest further testing to confirm our findings and measure the extent of the mold problem in the building. If our findings are confirmed, the building will not be safely habitable until a professional mold remover is hired to eradicate the mold. Ignoring the problem would not be wise. At this point, the residents are experiencing mild asthma attacks and occasional allergic reactions. These symptoms will only grow worse over time, leading to potentially life—threatening situations. Contact us at (325) 555—1327 if you would like us to further explain our methods and/ 01' results. Types of Activity Reports Figure 22.5: (continued) realize that your journal keeps you on task and saves you time in the long run. ‘ one of the nice things about writing activity reports is that you have already devet Moreover, when you need to report on your activities for the week or month, you will i , oped most of the content.You are probably familiar with your readers. So, minimal have a record Of all the things YOU accompliShed- planning is required, and the research has been mostly completed. These internal 1 ‘ reports, after all, simply describe your activities. . . t . Analyzing the Rhetorical Situation ‘ H A good workplace practice you might adopt is keeping an actzvzty Journal or work ' . . . . W'th ' ' ' 1 i‘ r “ log on your computer or m a notebook. In your Journal, start out each day by Jottmg sh2u1g%:;;0£e;figmggggyifieafififiy todpétan out yotl-r ac; 1‘th report'You ’ l f . ' down the things you need to accomplish. As you complete each of these activities, y g e an OW Ques lons' I i note the dates and times they were completed and the results. Who might read or use this activity report? ,5 Computers can also help you keep track of your activities. Software like Why do the}, want the report? I ‘ Llamagraphic’s Life Balance and groupware programs like Lotus Notes and i r . I t ‘ . g an d Researcl . g Ac Reports At first, keeping an activity journal will seem like extra work. But, you will soon i Microsoft Outlook can maintain “to do” lists while keeping a calendar of your activi- What mférmatio” do they "aid to know-2 . ties (Figure 22.6). Similarly, personal digital assistants (PDAs) can also maintain a Where Will the report he used? “to do” list and your calendar. When you complete a task, you can cross it off your When will the report he used? ‘ ‘ list. The FDA will keep track of the time and date. " How might the report he used? ‘ ‘ After considering these questions, you can begin thinking about the rhetorical sit— ‘ 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 Z4 25 26 27 28 29 30 t R litmt'lRS Think about the people who will need to use your report. The readers of t t (Ema? 31 actrvrty reports tend to be your supervisors. Occasionally, though, these kinds of re— m ~ ~ i i ‘ Th “To D0,, Page from an Activity Journal uatlon that will shape how you write the activity report or present your briefing. i r e t . t - . s r. s w s . . . . . l| ‘ . lift [geiplitrgck 9 0 or N t r t 7 W r099 tlst 7 Klgurtetzgts- ft 5L1 Bilthl The SUbJBCt of your report includes your recent actrvrtres. Include only t w e s = WW *"gr‘"*" 7 ~ ~ ~»~ a re so ware ~ - , . I :0 be iandled {2 Ourline E7?BE’ET’©W§Eeg‘—c§“§§aa£;" 3 5 Task: Prepare for briefinu of VP “1:00 on XM pro gra ":13 and mformatron your readers need to know. Remove any unneeded want—to—tell mforma- each day V—cm‘l‘t 7"“ NW5" ' N” groupware have the mo“- Afier 311: YOU did many thll' 1gs that could be mentioned in the report, but your i . r; - ' : AM . t0 — feag'ofiamp'“ 3W” W“ “5 p, , 7 _ abitity to keep a "to readers don’t need to hear about all of them. i ‘ do : Finish collecllng lab data 11:40 AM ‘ Happens: 78" due dm I! do" list and calendar 0 ‘2 Prepare slides for Wednesday's 1 . ' ' " ' W" j - . i color coding . M g'regnerafrion; _ n m u my“ °“°' 12’ "20°" Lori) 19“? '5 3 PURPOSE The purpose of your report is to describe what happened and what will - _} _ e r or us n90 . " .' r ' - - - , ‘ allows users to it 132mm” g",ng a , fime‘ 3‘15 PM - Llamagrapfiics called happen In the future. In your mtroductron, state your purpose directly: 0 ‘ Ca i ipa out new over ue , _ sw' v " T. t t I _ _ _ ,. d d Leadume. s ‘Huurs . Life Balance . prioritize Items 0... gfiifi‘;:;‘fil‘e:"e‘,;at, — ' In this memo Iwill summarize our r0 ress on the H ' ' ' _ _ .. , , ollm s ro ect dunn the month of I . on the HT0 D0" 0 :‘ Read Teller Industries Whlle — complete “masks m Md” August 2006 p g g p i g t (7 paper on global warming ‘ I ' ‘ 0 _ Find here! in Chicago for AXM 12/8106 - - r to: Ezmgtt‘ogemngmrnen mm ‘ The purpose of this briefing IS to update you on our research into railroad safety in t ‘ . Nonday r northwestern OhIO. ‘ 0 7 Update group website " " " " " " i i — ‘ to Month Week Day You might use some of the following action verbs to describe your purpose: . DecemberZOOB ’ Today ‘ :1: ( The calendar to explain to show to demonstrate m l Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fn 5m I I“ 1 2 :an b: USE-d :0 to Illustrate to present to exhibit l%;:?r§erf?r$iheg a ‘ ‘ eep rac o . . , ’ t t 3 4 s 6 7 8 9 day_to_day to Justifi/ to account for to display Efirapp‘gfégo to 10 1]. 12 13 14 15 16 . . . . I I r ‘ . ‘ i actIVItIes. t0 Olltlme to summarize to Inform page 21. I I ports are read by clients (lab reports or briefings) or used to support testimony F0r more ideas (white papers). An incident report, especially when it concerns an accident, may have abOUt reader , Source: Llamagraphicsi Life Balance a range of readers who plan to use the document in a variety of ways. An insurance SflZ‘gf’gf'gfum to H .I ‘ adjuster, for example, may use the incident report very differently than the quality page 41. Chapter 22 Planning and 6 5 7 Activity Reports 0 2 , - I (9* 6,3,4 I ‘ . . I. u » ~ . r - i I Researching Actmty Reports - 6) ‘ ‘ j ‘ * 7 t i ' With“. For more help defining the context, go to Chapter 3, page 49. 658 Tom Web er ELECTRICAL ENGINEER, US. DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE,WASI-HNGTON, D.C. Tom Weber works in Washington, DC, as a technical advisor for two government agencies within the US. Department of Defense. What is a white paper and how are they used? In Washington, DC, engineers and scientists often act as advisors to the executive and legislative branches and play an important role in briefing policymakers and congressional staff on technical issues. Because time for meetings is limited, these briefings are usually accompanied by a short technical document, or white paper, that explains the issue in question. Although meant to be an objective technical appraisal, white papers will often in- fluence a policy decision or promote a specific program or research agenda. These papers are short, usually four pages or fewer, and cover the technical goals and ben- efits of a new policy or program. For example, a white paper on power system relia—- bility, with a technical explanation of recent problems and proposed solutions, might be given to administrators at the Department of Energy considering new regulatory policies for the electric power industry. A White paper on the benefits of nanotech- nology might be given to congressional staff working on next year’s budget priorities for federally funded research and development programs. In a white paper, the writer must clearly explain, to a mostly nontechnical audi— ence, the relevant technical issues, and come to a logical conclusion as to the best decision and path forward within current political realities. All this must be accom— plished in just a few pages. With the incredible information flow in our nation’s cap— ital, most government decision makers will have only a few minutes to review any one document. control officer at your company would.You need to compose your report to suit both of these readers’ needs. CONTEXT OF USE The context of use for your activity report will vary. In most cases, your readers will simply scan and file your report. Similarly, oral briefings are not all that exciting. Your listeners will perk up for the information that interests them, but they will mostly be checking to see if you are making progress. Nevertheless, take a moment to decide whether your activity report discusses any topics that involve troublesome ethical or political issues. Throughout your career, you will find that these kinds of seemingly insignificant reports will surface when things go wrong at your company. When mistakes happen, auditors and lawyers will go through your activity reports, looking for careless statements or admissions of fault. So, your statements need to reflect your actual actions and the results of your work. Moreover, if you are reporting expenses in your activity report, they need to be ac— curate. Auditors and accountants will look at these numbers closely. If your numbers don’t add up, you may have some explaining to do. Chapter 22 Activity Reports Subject line clearly defines subject of the Organizing and Drafting Activity Reports Remember, organizing and drafting activity reports should not take too much time. If you find yourself taking more than an hour to write an activity report, you are prob- ably spending too much time on this routine task. To streamline your efforts, remember that all technical documents have an intro- duction, a body, and a conclusion. Each of these parts of the document makes pre- dictable moves that you can use to guide your drafting of the report. Writing the Introduction Readers of your activity report are mostly interested in the facts. So, your introduc— tion should give them only a brief framework for understandng those facts. To pro— v1de this framework, you should concisely 0 define your subject. 0 state your purpose. 0 state your main point. Figure 22.7: shows an example of a concise introduction. In this example, the first sentence identifies the subject (“retooling the Wichita Falls plant”) and states the main point (“we made significant progress”). The second sentence states the purpose of the document. Introduction for an Activity Report (Minimal) Blue Ribbon Manufacturing Date: September 30, 2006 To: Alice Freedman, District Manager From: Jim Fredrickson, Manufacturing briefing. —l——> Subject: 9/30 Briefing on Retooling Progress introduction is In September 2006, we made significant progress toward comiise’ —l——> retooling the Wichita Falls plant. In this briefing, we will describe our progress since the end of August, and we will outline our activities for the nerd month. stating the purpose and main point. Organizing and Drafting Activity Reports Figure 22.7: An introduction should state the subject, purpose, and main point of the activity report or briefing. 659 . i If your readers are not familiar with your project (e.g., you are giving a demon- l stration to clients), you might want to expand the introduction by also offering back- ‘ ground information, stressing the importance of the subject, and forecasting the body i. , i. of the report. I ‘ Figure 22.8 shows the introduction of a document that would accompany a ‘ E‘ i ii m demonstration. This example includes all the typical moves found in an introduction. 1 i‘ For more adVice The first paragraph offers background information. The second paragraph states the .0” writing purpose and defines the subject. Then, the author stresses the importance of the sub- Céfli’e, ject and states the main point of the demonstration. The last three sentences forecast 2‘ i y 8, page 187- what will happen during the demonstration. Take Note The length of your introduction depends on the readers’ familiarity with your work and project. A reader familiar with your work, like your supervisor, needs only the subject, purpose, and main point stated. A reader unfamiliar with your work might also need background information, a statement about the importance of the subject, and forecasting. Writing the Body In the body of the activity report, you should include some or all of the following: Summary of activities—In chronological order, summarize the project’s two to five major events since your previous activity report. Don’t dwell too much on the details. Instead, tell your readers briefly what you did and highlight any advances or setbacks in the project. Results of activities or research—In order of impOItance, list the two to five most significant results or outcomes of your project. To help a reader scan, you might even use bullets to highlight these results. Full Introduction for an Activity Report Figure 22.8: When readers are less familiar with the subject, you _ _ might add Future activities or research—Tell readers what you will be doing during backgmund thenextworkpenod. Always MOV’"9 Forward $222132“ Expenses—If asked, you should state the costs incurred over the previous Nanotech Micromachines Demonstration for Senators Laura Geertz and Brian Hanson Presented by Gina Gould, Head Engineer week or month. Highlight any places where costs are deviating from the project’s budget. importance of the subject, and forecast the rest of the document. The body of the activity report shown in Figure 22.9 includes these four items. l Nanotechnology is the creation and utilization of functional I j materials, devices, and systems with novel properties and funct10ns Writing the Conclusion r d that are achieved through the control of matter, atom by atom, I . . I i ‘ aigrrfiaiijonn is molecule by molecule, or at the macromolecular level. A revolutlon The Condusmn Shoum be as bnef as DOSSIble' You Should ‘ offered for has begun in science, engineering, and technology, based on the . restate your main point. . readers ability to organize, characterize, and manipulate matter . restate your purposa unfamiliar with Systematlcally at the “anoscale‘ 0 make any recommendations, if appropriate. the top'c' In this demonstration, we will show you how the 5492 Group at 0 look to the future. / Wilson National Laboratory is applying breakthroughs in . Purpose. am! nanotechnology science toward the development of revolutionary main pornt are . new micromachines. Our work since 2002 has yielded some amazing mentloned results that might dramatically expand the capacity of these tlny here' devices. These concluding moves should be made in a maximum of two to four sentences. To conclude, in this demonstration our goal was to update you on our progress toward developing nanotechnology micromachines. Overall, it looks like we are making solid progress toward our objectives, and we seem to be on schedule. Over the next couple of months, we will be facing some tough technical challenges. At that point, we will know if Forecasting ‘> Today, we will first show you a few of the prototype micromachines shows the we have developed with nanotechnology principles. Then, we will micromaChineS are feaSible With Current t(“—ChrlOlogll- l structure of resent data gathered from testing these prototypes. And finally, we ' . . . . the briefing. grill discuss future uses of nanotechnology in micromachine The conFluSmn Show In Flgure 22.9 15 pmbably'more Common than thls exam' . engineering. ple. It con01sely restates the memo’s main point, ending the memo. For more Ideas Keep in mind that most readers will not read the conclusion closely, if they read am“ writing . . . . . l ' . 1t at all. So, your conclus10n should not hung up any new mformatlon that they cone “Slons go . . to Chapter 8, nught miss. page 202. Chapter 22 7' _ ‘ _ i Activity Reports ’ ‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ’ i ‘ ‘ ' ' ' Reports Making and Using PDFs Increasingly, companies are asking for activity reports to be submitted in portable document format (PDF). Documents in PDF retain the exact look of the original, in- cluding the page layout and graphics. However, they do not require the same amount of memory space as other kinds of documents, so they are easily sent through e—mail, Progress Report Figure 22.9: A progress report l keeps things t‘ l brief, discussing what happened, L ‘ TRIE ' the results, and stored on a computer, or placed on a website for downloading. i l INDUS . - - S . what will happen PDFs also have some other helpful features: t l AUiomai’O” Development D'V'S’on in the future. ‘ l ‘ 0 They have an almost identical appearance on all computers, so your file won’t look different if someone is using a different kind of computer (PC, Macintosh, Memo header Date: 28 February 2006 FDA).- ‘ ‘ l ‘ identifies —i—> To; Hal Roberts, Division Head ‘ I They molude password protection to keep a file from being altered. l Primary readers From: Sally Fenker) Green RObOt Project Manager 0 They can include an electronic signature to signal your ownership or support 1 and subject of Subject: Progress Report on Green Robot Proiec of the document. . report. A1 . . . . . l . so, if ou are scannin documents, PDF IS robabl the most effluent wa to The ___—__> we are pleased to report that We haVe made Significant Progress In ~ save them a usable formgat (Figure A). p y y introduction is coding for the X53 Manufacturing Robot. concise. In September, we coded for the lateral movement of the robots arm. We developed several usable subroutlnes that should improve ltS Th: rafmth Se scanned Document in Portable Document Format vr les ar placement accuracy. ac I I 7 I ~ A“ imam“ a . l’l ’ .320” . ., :1. II): “M”. . ‘ ~ . . if if . F A: So far, the results of our work are looking good: wigglinzed r 7 is F p. ( r e . ,riwmgmwmwkflui 1: u .4 3 ..t Oi 8:31:12: d The rfsurllts . placement accuracies pf ririlrlrllte interpretation. l .2 documents work are c ea y - speed of 20 placeme'n s p. _ Hanson Engineering well In PDF Stated- - frozen arm only 3 times 1n 100 trlals. F t B tt because they t fthe software. One U fir-e. ” 9‘13 ,c . reduire less 1“ MarCh’ We hope tOFOmpletfldfizprlifin {sight now, it looks like actlvmes are manlpula’te é Isfiififgmgmmfl memory than do member Of our teafm lshculi/ien yll t gfgthg-robot Of course that discussed. text on the S-bMPmmem‘N-mhls most other e’re on SCl‘ledUle or t e ay r0 Cu O I e ' ’ mismomlmemm mstatmloml 'tt nmwdtsaliniulionnklhod l ‘ depends on the folks over in manufacturlng. screen' m a“ 3 formats. They also maintain trttt requires less any Iiun mammal melhods. Qu' mivilies this "mil hm: cornered Mound lull-g In: 50']! dcniininiiw ‘ At this point, we’re running a bit over budget, due to higher—than— maltedIhunediscussed‘ilh)mtariietmis)w.\VilhsoiupamlsMemlning their original lurepifai:lb:Inn‘suuunldesaiiniuliouofunkflfigum A). In mtsystettt. “ a earance Here ‘ ‘ ted contractor costs. We’re perhaps $2,000 oven . Pp ~ expec . . C The conclusion ikwsiulmlhtnmrmwdlilhmtrrseosmosiand[munltriswmuwdlnleam. is a Scanned , Otherwise, we’re on schedule and looking forward to finishing. a is brief and document in PDF , me or e—mail me if you have any questlons. ‘ Update on costs is given. PV solar Panel looks ahead. opened In Adobe \ Acrobat. {scanned page sail water salt minim Flgun A: The Dmlilimr . ‘ Graphic l appears in its ’ l original form w: m succeeding on a stun scale. Right now. at:me dealt-mo! can produce In “rug: :3 put-m ur insults. at hum. Cwlrmi). u: m: lurking t. in. II: spit-n to 5mm»: its efficiency. m4 vle soon bop: Io be producing 5 gallons or rtslv. a!" u bout. W: m beginning to stem} om plans for 2 largest“ mludesxiinizalion plmr (in! mild be able Io ptutlwz [hmxsmds of gallons or freshwater per mt. We will discuss our ideas Milli )m at In: April 17 meeting. («mm-nu mt supplies and cqulpmeu expenses rut this month were 33.92). molt; lute Ihings ate going Mil. Email me nut hm questions (continued) Organizing an: Drafting Activi :Zifiitfiryzlfeports ' Reports For more For more information on using plain style, see Chapter 9, page 212. information on using an appropriate tone, go to Chapter 9, page 227. 664 Until recently, you would usually have needed a program called Adobe Acrobat to create and read PDF documents (Adobe Acrobat Reader can be downloaded free of charge from www. adobecom). Today, word—processing programs like Microsoft Word and Corel WordPerfect will allow you to convert text files into PDF files. With Acrobat, you can also convert other kinds of texts, like PowerPoint or Presentation files, into PDF format. To save a file as a PDF: 1. Select “Print” in your word processor or presentation program. 2. Select “Print as PDF” in the Print box that pops up. Instead of making a hard copy on your printer, your computer will convert your document or presentation into a PDF file. 3. Save this new PDF document on your hard drive. Now you can store the PDF file, send it as an attachment, or put it on a website for downloading. As technical workplaces continue evolving toward the goal of the“paperless - Office,” it is likely that PDFs will become a typical format for sending documents of all kinds, including activity reports. Using Style and Design in Activity Reports Generally, activity reports follow a plain style and use simple design. These docu- ments are mostly informative, not overly persuasive, so writers should try to keep them rather straightforward. Using a Plain Style As you revise your document with style in mind, pay attention to the following items: Sentences—Using plain style techniques, make sure that (1) the subject is the “deer” of most sentences and (2) the verb expresses the action in most sentencesVVhere appropriate, eliminate any prepositional chains. Paragraphs—Each paragraph should begin with a topic sentence that makes a direct statement or claim that the rest of the paragraph will sup— port. This topic sentence will usually appear as the first or second sentence of each paragraph. Tone—Since activity reports are often written quickly, you should make sure you are projecting an appropriate tone. It might be tempting to be sar- castic or humorous, but this is not the place. After all, you never know how the activity report might be used in the future. While giving briefings, you want to project a professional tone. If you have negative information to convey, state it candidly with no apologies. Chapter 22 Activity Reports Using Design and Graphics The design of your activity report should be straightforward also. Usually, the design of these documents is governed by a standard format, like a memo format or perhaps a standardized form for lab reports.Your company will specify the format for activity reports. Otherwise, you might use the templates available with your word-processing program. If you want to add any visuals, you should center them in the text and place them after the point where you refer to them. Even though activity reports tend to be short, you should still label the graphic and refer to it by number in the text. If you are presenting a briefing orally, you should look for ways to include graph— ics to support your presentation. Photographs can help the audience visualize what you are talking about, so use your digital camera to snap some pictures. Graphs are always helpful for showing trends in the data. Revising, Editing, and Proofreading Even though activity reports and briefings are usually considered “informal” docu- ments, you should devote some time to revising, editing, and proofreading them.Your reports, after all, might turn up in the future when the stakes are higher. Perhaps they might be reviewed during your performance evaluation. Or, maybe they might be studied by auditors, who are trying to figure out where mistakes were made. An activity report that has not been revised, edited, or proofread will make you look un- professional in these situations. Revising and Editing Your Activity Reports While revising and editing, look back at your original notes about the rhetorical situ— ation in which the activity report might be used: SL'BJ 143(LT Does your report provide all the information that readers need to know? Have you included any additional want—to-tell information that can be removed? PURPOSE Does the report achieve your intended purpose and the purpose you stated in the introduction of the document? If you want readers to do something, is it stated up front or clearly in the body? READERS Does the report satisfy the needs of the primary readers (action takers) and secondary readers (advisors)? If an auditor, lawyer, or reporter read the docu- ment, would they be satisfied that it is accurate and truthful? CONTEXT OF [7812 Are the format and design appropriate for the places where the document will be used? Can readers scan the document quickly to locate the most important information? If the report was taken out of context, would it still project a sense of professionalism? Revising, Editing and Proofreading For help using templates, go to Chapter 17, page 490. For more information on editing documents, turn to Chapter 12, page 314. 665 MEI IAEIH I11 ’2’: 5:: 112 Wm em I'I'I n _| U? 666 ProofreadingYour Document Proofread your activity report closely before printing it out or hitting the Send button. These documents are typically written quickly, so they often contain small typos, misspellings, and grammar errors. Allow yourself a few minutes to read the text sentence by sentence to locate any annoying errors. You may even print out a copy of the document and look it over on paper. Often, errors you did not catch on the screen are more noticeable in the paper version. ' Activity reports include progress reports, briefings, white papers, reports that accompany demonstrations, incident reports, and lab reports. ' An activity report typically includes the following sections: introduction, surmnary of activities, results of activities, future activities, expenses, and conclusion. ' While preparing to write an activity report, analyze the rhetorical situation by anticipating the readers and the context in which the report will be used. ° The style and design of activity reports should be plain and straightforward. ' Edit and proofread activity reports carefully. In the future, they may be used in an unexpected context, so you want them to reflect a sense of professionalism. Individual or Team Projects 1. For a week, keep a journal that tracks your activities related to school or work. Each day, make up a “to do” list. Then, as you complete each task, cross it off and write down the results of the task. In a memo to your instructor, summarize your activities for the week and discuss whether the activity journal was a helpful tool or not. 2. While you are completing another large project in this class or another, write a progress report to your instructor in which you summarize what has been accom- plished and what still needs to be completed. The progress report should be sub- mitted in memo format. 3. Think back to an accident that occurred in your life. Write an incident report in which you explain what happened, the actions you took, and the results of those actions. Then, discuss how you made changes to avoid that kind of accident in the future. Chapter 22 Activity Reports 4. While completing alarger project for your class (like a proposal or report), give a 2: to 3—minute briefing on that project to your class. Summarize your activities, discuss the results, and discuss what will happen in the future. Collaborative Project Your group has been asked to develop a standardized information sheet that will help students report accidents on your campus. Think of all the different kinds of accrdents that might happen on your campus.Your information sheet should explain how to report an accident to the proper authorities on campus. Encourage the users of the Information sheet to summarize the incident in detail, discuss the results and make recommendations for avoiding similar accidents in the future. , Of course, numerous potential accidents might occur on campus.Your group may need to categorize them so that readers contact the right authorities. Revision Challenge The activity report in Figure A is intended to notify students of the recent changes in computer use policies at their small college. How would you revise this report to help it achieve its purpose? Exercises and Projects aw 668 Smith College Office of the Provost Date: August 4, 2006 To: Smith College students From: Provost George Richards Subject: File—Sharing Smith College has worked hard to develop a top—notch computer network on campus to provide access to the Internet for a varlety of purposes. As a Smith student, you are welcome to use these computers for legal purposes, You will find the college '5 computer usage policies explained in the Computer Policy for szterjollege, version 03.28.03, which is in effect until eclipsed by a I‘CVlSlOH. Illegal downloading and sharing of copyrighted materials is a problem, especially music files, over our network. V iolatlng our computer usage policies puts the college at rlsk for copyright infringement lawsuits. Our information technology experts also tell me that these activities slow down our network because these files require large amounts of bandwidth. Recently, we have installed network tools and filters that allow us to detect and block illegal file sharing. We are already warning students about illegal use. After October 1, 2006, we will begin discipllning people who share files illegally by suspending thelr computer privileges. Repeated Violations will be referred to the college 5 Academic Integrity Review Board. You should know that if a complaint is filed by copyright owners, Smith College must provide your name and address to prosecutors. Our computer usage policy explicitly states that us1ng college . computers for illegal activities is forbidden and those who do Will be prosecuted. Thank you for giving us this opportunity to stress the seriousness of this situation. We expect your compliance. Chapter 22 o Activity Reports ‘3 Figure A: This activity report needs help. How might you revise it? Bad Chemistry Amanda Jones works as a chemical engineer at BrimChem, one of the top plastics com- panies in the country. Recently, her division had hired a bright new chemical engineer named Paul Gibson. Paul was tall and good—looking, and he was always polite. At lunch during Paul’s first week, Amanda and a co—worker teased him about being a “Chippendales guy.” Paul laughed a little, but it was apparent that the comment of- fended him. So, Amanda was careful from then on about her comments regarding his appearance. A few months after starting at BrimChem, Paul went to a convention and came back somewhat agitated. Amanda asked him what was wrong. After a pause, Paul told her that one of the managers, Linda Juno, had made a pass at him one evening at the con- vention, suggesting he come up to her room “for a drink.” When he declined, she became angry and said, “Paul, you need to decide whether you want to make it in this company.” She didn’t speak to him for the rest of the convention. Paul told Amanda he was a bit worried about keeping his job with the company, since he was still on “probationary” status for his first year. Being on probation meant Linda or anyone else could have him fired for the slightest reason. Later that day, though, Linda came down to Paul’s office and seemed to be patching things up. After Linda left his office, Paul flashed Amanda a thumbs-up signal to show that things were all right. The next week, Amanda was working late and passed by Paul’s office. Linda was in his office giving him a backrub. He was obviously not enjoying it. He seemed to be making the best of it, though, and he said, “OK, thank you. I better finish up this report.” Linda was clearly armoyed and said, “Paul, I let you off once.You better not disap- point me again.” A minute later, Linda stormed out of Paul’s office. The next day, Paul stopped Amanda in the parking lot. “Amanda, I know you saw what happened last night. I’m going to file a harassment complaint against Linda. If I’m fired, I’ll sue the company. I’m tired of being harassed by her and other women in this company.” Amanda nodded. Then Paul asked, “Would you write an incident report about What you saw last night? I want to put some materials on file.” Amanda said she would. A week later, Paul was fired for a minor mistake. Amanda hadn’t finished writing up the incident report. If you were Amanda, What would you do at this point? If you wrote the report, what would you say and how would you say it? Case Study ...
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 08/25/2011 for the course ENGLISH 420 taught by Professor Staff during the Summer '11 term at Purdue.

Page1 / 14

22 - 644 The Mole Henry Espinoza knew this proposal was...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 14. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online