Lecture8_5

Lecture8_5 - 11/9/2010 AME 331 Introduction to Fluid...

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11/9/2010 1 AME 331 Introduction to Fluid Mechanics Chapter 8: Internal Incompressible Viscous Flow Prof. Jesse Little University of Arizona 11/10/10 1 Lecture Preview and Assignments Today 8.6-8.7 Read 8.8 for next time HW 9 posted and due Friday 2
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11/9/2010 2 Chapter 8 Review We were able to obtain solutions to Navier Stokes for some steady, laminar, fully developed flows Parallel plates Stationary One plate moving Gravity (body force) and pressure driven (surface force) Pipes These are some of the few viscous problems we can solve analytically. We can’t do this for turbulent flows and discussed why last time. Most real pipe flow systems are turbulent and developing and we don’t have analytical solutions for these problems Now what? 3 Energy Considerations (8-6) We have been using Bernoulli with the relevant assumptions. This tells us how these variables roughly relate in a pipe. It is not fully correct because of pipe flows are viscous and often turbulent. We will still use some elements of Bernoulli but will see that the Bernoulli “constant” tends to decrease because of the viscous effects. Considering pipe flows with energy concepts we can see that friction (viscosity) creates energy losses 4
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11/9/2010 3 Energy Considerations (8-6) Consider conservation of energy for flow in some generic pipe 5 Energy Considerations (8-6) We can no longer assume uniform velocity at the CV
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Lecture8_5 - 11/9/2010 AME 331 Introduction to Fluid...

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