Sweatshops (1)

Sweatshops (1) - As competition continues to increase on...

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Unformatted text preview: As competition continues to increase on both a domestic and global level, retail stores are pressured to make the least expensive products they can. In the 1960s and 1970s, the world began to see large corporations close their factories and have their products made overseas in developing countries. How could they be blamed? Any smart business executive would see the potential profits in contracting work from an Indonesian worker earning 20 cents per hour as opposed to an American earning around eight dollars per hour for the same work. While this shift in tactics tends to favor the consumer and the profit- driven corporations, it causes a great deal of harm to the employees overseas. Laborers in these sweatshops work for extended periods of time under very dangerous and unhealthy conditions, receiving extremely low wages for their work. Sweatshops are defined by the US Department of Labor as any factory that violates two or more labor laws, such as those pertaining to wages and benefits, working hours, and child labor (Sweatshops, Green America). Although most consumers these days are more aware and conscious of these human rights violations, most retailers still conveniently turn a blind eye to this practice. The exploitation of workers in these 1 sweatshops is a serious issue facing our world today, an issue that many are unhappy about, yet few do anything to fix. Sweatshops have flourished in recent decades in many developing countries because they tend to emerge in places where there is an extensive supply of labor, and where there are little or no alternative sources of income. These workers are willing to work under terrible conditions including low wages, long hours, forced overtime, harassment, tightly crammed work areas with no ventilation, and dangerous fire hazards. Despite the many problems that are associated with sweatshops, they remain very alluring to the majority of citizens in these developing countries. Although in the United States we find this hard to believe, these sweatshops hold a great deal of importance to people in these places, because without them the people would be completely out of work. This is not to say that these workers, making hardly enough to survive on, enjoy their line of work, but it at least provides for them the minimum needed to survive on. Some people may be curious why these people continue to subject themselves to these harsh conditions, and the answer is because there is no other option for them. In many 2 sweatshops, if a worker speaks out about the conditions or challenges their employers in any way, they are replaced by one of the many others waiting in line for their job. This seemingly endless supply of workers willing to work for close to nothing in these developing countries is what keeps this poverty cycle in motion....
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Sweatshops (1) - As competition continues to increase on...

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