Earth 20 Notes

Earth 20 Notes - Earth20Notes 16:33...

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Earth 20 Notes  16:33 Office hours: 11-1:30 MW at Webb Hall 1112 Email:  gurrola@geol.ucsb.edu Required Text: Natural Disasters, 7 th  Edition (8 th  is too expensive) by Patrick L.  Abbott. Read chapter 1 by Section #2: NO SECTION THIS WEEK!!! 2 exams: Midterm on May 3, 2010 Final is  during finals week Texts count for 80% of your grade Homework is extra credit and class is based on 80% tests, and 20% discussion  quizzes. Each homework that you turn in gets you a half bonus point for each assignment. Types of Catastrophes: Earthquakes Volcanoes Tsunami Fires Mass movements
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Floods Extreme weather Mass extinctions Human fatalities in natural Disasters Sawtooth- shaped curve caused by largest natural disasters Biggest killers (in order): hurricanes, earthquakes, floods, severe weather,  landslides, volcanic eruptions, tornadoes, and tsunami Human response to disaster Our behavior changes following disasters More outward directed concerns and actions Destruction and damage to structures, loss of productivity and wages Increase in economic losses over time is result of increase in human population  and urbanization Most expensive events typically are caused by storms and occurred in U.S.,  Europe and Japan Natural Hazards Hazard exists even where the disasters are infrequent We can evaluate site risk We can do mitigation prior to event o Engineering, physical, social and political plans and preparations to  reduce both death and destruction from natural hazards
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Mitigation after event o Rebuilding and re-inhabitating same site Case history: Popocatepetl Volcano, Mexico  o Eruptions in 822, 1519 and beginning in 1994 o Currently 100,000 people living at base Haitian earthquake is another example of Case history Magnitude, Frequency, and Return Period: In general, there is a inverse correlation between frequency (how often it  occurs) and magnitude (how big it is) of a process o Frequent occurrences are low in magnitude, rare occurrences are high in  magnitude o Small scale activity is common, big events are rare
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This note was uploaded on 08/26/2011 for the course EARTH 20 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '11 term at UCSB.

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Earth 20 Notes - Earth20Notes 16:33...

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