Chapter_14_Lecture_Notes

Chapter_14_Lecture_Notes - Chapter 14 Lecture Notes 1 More...

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Chapter 14 Lecture Notes 1. More on the Third Dimension Chapter 14 examines the creative approach to the crafts as fine art. As in Chapter 13, Sculpture, the artists have explored traditional processes, as well as newer, non-traditional approaches such as mixed media, installation, multimedia, and performance art. 2. Craft or Art? Differentiating between craft and art is difficult, and classification into one category or another is sometimes controversial. Craft objects are traditionally thought of as those created for utilitarian purposes. In the 20 th century, the crafts lost their traditional association with functionality. In many ways, craft artists, like fine artists, were able to shed their bonds to utilitarian concerns, and create works that expressed the creative spirit of the individual. Other artists such as Miriam Schapiro (see an example of Schapiro‟s Night Shade , fig. 208) created art using “craft” media as a conceptual basis for their work. Consider Schapiro‟s statement “decoration pulls us all together and is not elitist, non-sexist, and non- racist.” We identify Josiah Wedgwood‟s Apotheosis of Homer Vase (fig. 410) as a utilitarian object, a vase, yet we also view it as a painting because of the image he painted on the vase with glaze. What would you consider Apotheosis of Homer Vase to be? Craft or Art? 3. Clay The process of creating ceramics is one that invites variation of technique from the early stage of constructing a form to the type of glazing applied, to the type of kiln the work is fired in. If at all possible, make arrangements to visit a ceramic studio to see actual ceramic works in the various stages of production. Watching an artist „throw a pot‟ on the wheel is fascinating (see fig. 415, Wheel Throwing). Clay has been universally embraced to create utilitarian vessels, plates, and pitchers throughout history. See Hon‟ami Koetsu‟s tea bowl Amagumo (fig. 413), María Montoya Martinez, Jar (fig. 414), Euthymides, Revelers (fig. 412) and Ming Dynasty Plate (fig. 420 ), and Betty Woodman‟s Floral Vase and Shadow (fig. 421) to compare and contrast the aesthetics of these dinnerware pieces by various cultures in history. 4.
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Chapter_14_Lecture_Notes - Chapter 14 Lecture Notes 1 More...

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