All of the compounds in this problem are salts

All of the compounds in this problem are salts - All of the...

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All of the compounds in this problem are salts , and will therefore separate into cations and anions as soon as they dissolve. For example, the first compound breaks up like this: The fourth compound breaks up like so: What you must ask yourself in each case is whether the cations or anions might act as a Brønsted-Lowry acid, a Brønsted-Lowry base, or neither. There are four important facts to keep in mind: The conjugate base of a weak acid acts as a weak base. For example, the data given in the question tell you that is the conjugate base of a weak acid (), and will therefore acts as a weak Brønsted-Lowry base: In this reaction accepts protons from water, producing hydroxide () anions and raising the pH of the solution -- that is, making the solution basic. The weaker a weak acid, the stronger its conjugate base. You might say that the more reluctantly an acid donates its proton to water, the more eagerly its conjugate base tries to get the proton back. That means, for example, that since the
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This note was uploaded on 08/26/2011 for the course CH 302 taught by Professor Holcombe during the Spring '07 term at University of Texas.

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All of the compounds in this problem are salts - All of the...

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