WoodFraming - Wood-Frame Construction 2008 Page 1...

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Wood-Frame Construction 2008 Page 1 Wood-Frame Construction Wood-frame construction has been the system of choice for many years. It has also been the subject of much research into the optimum value engineered framing design. For the most part, this research has been focused on the downward loads on the structure (e.g., dead load and snow load). More recently, as a result of the losses associated with Atlantic hurricanes, the capacity of the building to withstand uplift has become an important subject. The lumber saving and plywood saving techniques to be discussed are focused on reducing both labor and material in wood-frame house construction while maintaining house quality and value. Platform vs Balloon Framing Platform framing refers to the erection of a home one story at a time. In the case of a two-story building, the first-floor walls are erected and the floor system for the second story is set on top of the walls. The result is a one-story high “platform” on which to begin erection of the second story walls. With balloon framing , studs run full height from sill-plate on the first floor to the top plate, to a maximum of 20 feet. This method was popular before the 1930s and is still used on occasion for stucco and other masonry-walled two-story houses because such structures shrink and settle more uniformly than do platform structures. However, balloon framing is more dangerous to erect, and the long, straight wall studs required have grown increasingly expensive and scarce.
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Wood-Frame Construction 2008 Page 2 Balloon Framing with Full-height Studs Special Topics About Wood-Frame Construction Sill Plate - A wood-frame wall or floor system should be attached to the slab or foundation stem wall in order to resist lateral wind forces. In slab-on-grade foundations, the practice involves installing anchor bolts every 4 feet, drilling holes in the pressure- treated sill plate (aka, sole plate) to match the bolt spacing, and installing the plate with large washers and nuts. The plate is a pressure treated 2x4 or 2x6 to match the wall system it will support. A labor saving option is to use a tie-down strap rather than anchor bolts. The straps are imbedded in the concrete slab and simply bent over and attached to the sole plate when it is installed. In concrete masonry stem walls, the anchor bolts or straps must be imbedded in filled cores of the block. Attachment of the floor joists or the plate to the foundation is done in a fashion like the slab attachment. Traditionally, a 2x6 pressure treated sill plate is installed on top of the stem wall beneath the floor joists. A lumber and cost saving option is to use a 2x4 pressure treated plate.
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Wood-Frame Construction 2008 Page 3 Sill Plate Attachment: Metal Straps or Anchor Bolts are Imbedded in Slab or in Filled Cores of the CMU Stem Wall Glue-Nailed Floor Design - Wood-framed floor systems that use a plywood subfloor properly glued to the floor joists with a structural adhesive function like a composite T-
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WoodFraming - Wood-Frame Construction 2008 Page 1...

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