Lecture2aResourceIssues

Lecture2aResourceIssues - Resource Issues Lecture 2a Issues...

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Resource Issues Lecture 2a
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Issues and Thoughts Rapidly industrializing world is consuming resources at unprecedented rate Nonrenewable resources are being rapidly depleted or rich veins are depleted Renewable resources are being depleted faster than the generation rate. Question: How do we conserve nonrenewable resources and regenerate renewables while protecting biodiversity?
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Key Resources Air: degradation by human activities Water: Surface, groundwater, aquifers, fossil water Agricultural Soil: regeneration rate (best case) is 10 tons/hectare (1 mm deep soil over a hectare) Nonrenewable resources (the world’s geologic endowment): fossil fuels, ores Renewable resources (solar driven): forests, biomass, soil, fisheries Intangible resources (no upper limit): open space, beauty, serenity, genius, information, diversity, satisfaction
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Non-recoverable resources (present in the earth but not obtainable with present technology) Recoverable resources (not likely to be economic in foreseeable future) Undiscovered Discovered Proven Reserves Known reserves (located but not measured) Hypothetical , speculative, or inferred resources. Unconceived resources High Degree of geologic risk Low High Low Degree of economic feasibility Potential Economic Threshold Technological Threshold TOTAL RESOURCES Limit of Crustal Abundance
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Resource Consumption Scenarios
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Resource Consumption Patterns
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Peak Oil Update (Scientific American, August 2010)
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Hubbert’s Pimple - Oil Consumption
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Coal Production
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Uranium Production, France
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Reasonably assured (RAR), inferred (IR) and already produced uranium resources
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Availability of Common Metals
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Carrying Capacity ...the maximum population that can be sustained in a habitat without the degradation of the life-support system. sustained, instantaneous , maximum , optimum , human , physical , hydrologic , global , biophysical , real , and natural carrying capacity • carrying capacity per resource, K L contexts: biology, ecology, business management, anthropology, forestry, hydrology, and others Knowing the carrying capacity of an ecosystem is an important planning tool because it provides information on when the services of the ecosystem are being exceeded, leading to its possible collapse and the total or
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Carrying Capacity Constraints Human carrying capacity depends on both natural
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Lecture2aResourceIssues - Resource Issues Lecture 2a Issues...

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