Lecture9Materials - Lecture 9 Materials Prologue The...

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Unformatted text preview: Lecture 9 Materials Prologue The average American in their lifetime accounts for the use of 540 t of construction materials, 18 t of paper, 23 t of wood, 16 t of metals, and 32 t of organic chemicals. (p. 11, Worldwatch Paper 121, The Next Efficiency Revolution: Creating a Sustainable Materials Economy, John E. Young & Aaron Sachs, September 1994) Context • Materials are the most difficult problem to address in sustaining the built environment – What are ‘green materials’? – How do we evaluate them? – What is the best we can do? – What are the limitations? – How do we make industry change? • Materials flows between all economic sectors, construction uses about 40% in U.S. Revised Sustainable Construction Framework (1994-2005) Production 6. Life Cycle Costing Ecosystems Source: “Principles and a Model for Sustainable Construction,” C.J.Kibert, Proceedings of the 1 st International Conference on Sustainable Construction, Tampa, Florida USA, 6-9 November 1994 Principles of Sustainable Construction Minimize resource consumption (Conserve) Maximize resource reuse (Reuse) Use renewable or recyclable resources (Renew/ Recycle) Protect the natural environment (Protect nature) Create a healthy, non-toxic environment (Non-Toxics) Apply Life Cycle Cost Analysis (Economics) Pursue Quality in creating the built environment (Quality) Evolution of sustainable construction phases Products Design for the Environment (DfE) Planning New Urbanism Architecture Ecological design Construction Best construction practices Operation Green building operations Disposal Deconstruction Accelerating Progress- Closing Materials Loops • Products: DfE – Embedded in emerging science of Industrial Ecology – Well-established in other sectors: automotive, appliances, electronics – Materials selection and fastening systems are crucial • Design: Ecological design – Appears in virtually definitions of sustainable construction/green building – Weakest link in sustainable construction- evolution has been slow – Must include detailed and comprehensive natural systems integration • End of Life: Deconstruction – Whole/partial disassembly of buildings to enhance reuse and recycling – Design for deconstruction is an essential requirement DfE in Computer Industry Raw Materials New Components Build Certified Reprocessing Certified Reprocessing Deliver Customer Use Closed Loop Recycling Third Party Recycling Alternative Uses Return to Suppliers Materials for Recycling Sort/Inspect Disposal Goal: Zero to Landfill Dismantle Remove DfE Example – Xerox Corporation Solenium Carpeting, Interface, Inc.Solenium Carpeting, Interface, Inc....
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This note was uploaded on 08/27/2011 for the course BCN 6585 taught by Professor Kibert during the Fall '08 term at University of Florida.

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Lecture9Materials - Lecture 9 Materials Prologue The...

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