ch 9 digestive system slide guide

ch 9 digestive system slide guide - C h 9 : M a m m a lia n...

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Ch 9: Mammalian Digestive System Slide Guide This photographic atlas has been created to help guide you through the interpretation of the histological slides that accompany the digestive system lab in Functional Vertebrate Anatomy. The reading and the histological images have been adapted from A Photographic Atlas of Histology by Michael J. Leboffe 2003. You are expected to observe and identify anatomy in five representative slides from the mammalian digestive system. Please note that the images provided are guides to identifying the digestive system anatomy, and may not be identical to what you will observe under the microscope. While the reading and the images provide comprehensive detail, you are not responsible for everything seen in this guide. As you observe the representative slides, realize that the digestive tube is comprised of multiple organs, including the esophagus, stomach, small intestine, and large intestine. These organs have multiple cellular layers that you will be responsible for identifying in ALL slides observed. Moving from the lumen outward, these layers are the mucosa, submucosa, muscularis externa, and the serosa or adventitia. See Fig 14-11 for a schematic diagram of the digestive tube. Additionally, you will be responsible for specific anatomy unique to the different components of the digestive tube. They are detailed below. Slide 1- Esophagus Figs 14-12 a-d -squamous epithelium -esophageal glands Slide 2-Stomach Figs 14-16 a-c (Note that slide 2 details only some regions of the stomach-the body and fundus) -gastric glands comprised of chief and parietal cells -gastric pits Slide 3-Small Intestine Figs 14-17 a-c, 14-18 a -villi -goblet cells: single-celled, mucigen-secreting cells found in the respiratory and digestive tracts. Mucigen is converted to mucin (a major component of mucus) upon hydration. -crypts of Lieberkuhn
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Slide 4-Duodenum Figs 14-19 a-b -Brunner’s glands -crypts -villi Slide 5-Colon Figs 14-22 a-b -crypts of Lieberkuhn -goblet cells -lymphocytes
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A PHOTOGRAPHIC ATLAS OF HISTOLOGY buds. In addition, it is responsible for mixing chewed food with saliva to form a bolus. It is also involved in speech. The surface of the tongue is covered by papillae of three types. Filiform papillae are the most numerous and are hair-like in appearance. Their epithelium is keratinized. Fungiform papillae are globular with a nonkeratinized stratified squamous epithelium and vascular connective tis- sue within, which makes them appear reddish. Six to 14 circumvallate papillae are located in a row in the region known as the sulcus terminalis, about two-thirds of the way back on the tongue. Each is surrounded by a cleft into which serous von Ebner's glands drain. Most taste buds are located in the mucosa of these papillae. The bulk of the tongue is skeletal muscle arranged in
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This note was uploaded on 08/28/2011 for the course ZOO 3713c taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '08 term at University of Florida.

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ch 9 digestive system slide guide - C h 9 : M a m m a lia n...

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